Monthly Archives: July 2014

Mother and Daughter Fashions from the Forties and Fifties

Mother-Daughter robes from McCall, patterns 1289 and 1290. Store catalog, Dec. 1946.

Mother-Daughter robes from McCall, patterns 1290 and 1289. Store catalog, Dec. 1946.

Nos. 1289 (adult) & 1290 (child). McCall pattern catalog, Dec. 1946.

Nos. 1289 (adult) & 1290 (child). McCall pattern catalog, Dec. 1946.

These robes are from a 1940s Christmas catalog, but Mother-Daughter outfits were popular well into the fifties. I found examples from Butterick, Simplicity, and McCall.

These Butterick patterns show girls’ styles as identical to the women’s clothing as possible, as if girls really were “little women.”

Butterick Fashion News, Sept. 1943, pattern numbers 2626, 2663, 2570, 2664.

Butterick Fashion News, Sept. 1943, pattern numbers 2626, 2663, 2570, 2664.

BFN sept 1943 text  2626 2663 2570 2664

“Daughter chooses an identical coat frock to help Mummy on her busy days.” In reality, Mummy chose both their clothes.

More Mother & Daughter patterns from Butterick Fashion News, Sept. 1943. Pattern Nos. 2691, 2676, 2693, 2420.

More Mother & Daughter patterns from Butterick Fashion News, Sept. 1943. Pattern Nos. 2691, 2676, 2693, 2420.

BFN sept 1943 text 2691 2676 2693 2420

Simplicity Sundresses, 1948

Mother and Daughter patterns might be featured together, as in the listings above, but they sometimes appeared on different pages, like these charming Simplicity sundresses with bolero jackets. In this case, the child’s pattern has been modified to allow for its shorter skirt without noticeably scaling down the appliqued flowers:

Simplicity adult pattern #2397, page 3, and Simplicity girls' pattern #2415, page 8. Simplicity Fashion Preview, April 1948.

Simplicity adult pattern #2397, page 3, and Simplicity girls’ pattern #2415, page 8. Simplicity Fashion Preview (flyer), April 1948.

Sun or Swim Suits, 1950

McCall offered these Mother and Daughter playsuits on facing pages of the catalog:

"No. 1552, the Glamour Mermaid swim- or sun- suit." McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

“No. 1522, the Glamour Mermaid swim- or sun- suit.” McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

"No. 1523, the mermaid swim- or sun-suit." McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

“No. 1523, the mermaid swim- or sun-suit.” McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

The bloomers seem to work a lot better on the daughter! [Full pattern descriptions are at bottom of post.]

Mother and Daughter Matching Aprons, 1950

Mother and Daughter matching pinafores or smocked aprons, McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

Mother and Daughter matching pinafores or smocked aprons, McCall Needlework Catalogue, May 1950.

The daughter’s aprons had their own listing in the Children’s section; I have put both illustrations side by side to show how very similar the adult and child versions were:

McCall patterns #1532 (Mom) and #1533 (Daughter). May, 1950.

McCall patterns #1532 (Mom) and #1533 (Daughter).  Smocked  or embroidered pinafore aprons. May, 1950.

My mother had more enthusiasm for Mother-Daughter looks than I had. In the 1950s, it was assumed that little girls would want to be “just like Mommy.” I had suit with a dark red jacket and a plaid, pleated skirt — just like my Mother’s. I was given a little toy iron that really plugged in and got warm (not hot,) and a little toy stove (ditto.) I didn’t need a little apron “just like Mommy’s” to see where this was leading. . . .  And, even at age five, I had other plans.

More Pattern Information:

Mermaid Swim- or Sun- Suits

Pattern description for Adult playsuit #1522. May, 1950.

Pattern description for Adult playsuit #1522. May, 1950.

Pattern description for McCall girls' "mermaid" swim- or sun- suit #1523.

Pattern description for McCall girls’ “mermaid” swim- or sun- suit #1523.

Robes 1290 and 1289

mccall dec 1946 text robes 1290 1289

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Filed under 1940s-1950s, Accessory Patterns, Bathing Suits, Children's Vintage styles, Nightclothes and Robes, Sportswear, Swimsuits, Uniforms and Work Clothes, Vintage patterns

Underpinning the Twenties: Corsets and Corselets

“To be smart this season one must be more than slim. The figure must defy nature and be as flat as the proverbial flounder, as straight as a lead pencil, and boneless and spineless as a string-bean. One must be straight like a boy and narrow like a lady in a Japanese print.” – Delineator magazine, February 1924.

Two corselets from 1925. Left, Butterick pattern 5691; right, ad for Bien Jolie corsette # 6099. Delineator Magazine.

Two corselets from 1925. Left, Butterick corselette pattern 5691; right, ad for Bien Jolie corsette # 6099. Delineator magazine.

Corselets, Corselettes, Corsolettes, & Corsettes, 1924 to 1929

Delineator writer Evelyn Dodge explained the difference between a corset and a corselet in her “The New in New York” column dated July 1925:

“Not all women need corsets. Women with young, slender figures find that the corselet, which is a combination brassière and hip-confiner, is sufficient. It is unboned and is therefore as soft and flexible as the natural figure. It keeps the figure straight without making it rigid. It is made of soft light fabrics such as brassière material, broché coutil and fine washable satin and has elastic gores to fit in at the hip. “

“Corsets” were heavily boned and rigid. (“For the figure that is heavier… the corset becomes heavier with heavier material, more bones… and with lacings.” — Dodge) “Corselets” (or corselettes, corsolettes, corsettes, etc. — you could find many spelling variations even in the Delineator‘s articles and advertisements) were unboned, or very lightly boned, and flexible.

Bien Jolie Corsette ad, Delineator, March 1924.

Bien Jolie Corsette ad, Delineator, March 1924.

The woman in this 1924 Bien Jolie Corsette is doing something you couldn’t possibly do in a heavily boned corset: she is bending at the waist. (If you do bend too far in a metal-boned corset, the bones develop a permanent crimp, a dent or a bulge.) The ad says, “The freedom of the uncorseted figure and the long, slim lines demanded by the modes of today are both attained by the Bien Jolie Corsette. . . .”

A Delineator article called this boneless garment a “brassiere corset” early in 1924:

A Brassiere Corset for slender women, Feb. 1924. Delineator.

A Brassiere Corset for slight figures, Feb. 1924. Delineator.

Butterick Corselette Pattern No. 5691, 1924-1925

Butterick corselette pattern # 5961, Delineator, Dec. 1924.

Butterick corselette pattern # 5961, Delineator, Dec. 1924. The corselet is shown worn over bloomers.

In her July 1925 article, Evelyn Dodge went on to say:

“You can either buy or make your corselet. It is very easily made, and if the figure is large or small at one point or another the corselet can easily be fitted when it is being made.”

You can see that there are no boning channels in the corselette, but coutil is a non-stretch corset fabric vith very little ‘give.’ Elastic in yardage wide enough for mass-produced girdles was not available before 1930, according to Ewing (Fashion in Underwear, pp. 102-107), so some corselets of the 1920s show wide bands of overlapped elastic. You can see this in the illustration on the right, below.

Butterick pattern 5961 was featured again in January and March issues of Delineator. 1925.

Butterick pattern 5961 was featured again in January and March issues of Delineator, 1925.

1924 p 36 corselette 5691 descriptionThe pattern description doesn’t say whether this corselette opens with hooks and eyes under the left arm . . .

Does it open along a side seam?

Does it open along a side seam?

. . . or along the side front seam, like this commercially made corselet.

Bien Jolie Step-in Corsette ad, Delineator, April 1925.

Bien Jolie Step-in Corsette ad, Delineator, April 1925.

Dodge continues, “These corselets have been enormously successful for several reasons — their excellent lines, their inexpensiveness, and the fact that they can be washed as easily and as often as any other piece of lingerie. They are supple enough for sports and dancing and their unbroken lines are perfect under the light fabrics of evening gowns.”

Commercially Manufactured Corselets, 1924 to 1929

Although the spellings differed, the popularity of the corselet is apparent by the number that were advertised.

The Treo company, a line available through Sears, Roebuck’s catalog, as well as in stores, called this model a “Brassiere Girdle” combination garment:

Treo "Brassiere Girdle combination garment" ad from Delineator, May 1925.

Treo “Brassiere Girdle combination garment” ad from Delineator, May 1925.

The DeBevoise company suggested that this Step-in Corsette belonged in a bride’s trousseau:

DeBevoise Ad, June 1925. Delineator.

DeBevoise Ad, June 1925. Delineator.

This Warner’s corselette for large figures is “boned in the modern manner,” although the “silk jersey top” can’t have had much impact on a large bust.

Warner's Corselette Ad, April 1925. Delineator.

Warner’s Corselette Ad, April 1925. Delineator.

This Bien Jolie satin brocade corselette dates from 1924:

Bien Jolie Ad for Corsette # 6076, April 1924. Delineator.

Bien Jolie Ad for Corsette # 6078, April 1924. Delineator.

By 1926, flattened busts were going out of fashion and a more natural silhouette was beginning to replace the “unbroken straight line” of Butterick #5691.

Bien Jolie Corsette Ad, July 1926. Delineator.

Bien Jolie Corsette Ad, July 1926. Delineator. Note the elastic curving in toward the waist and the model’s curved silhouette.

By March, 1929, Delineator showed these “foundation” garments [note the name change; they are no longer ‘corselettes’] in an article about the latest underwear styles:

Foundation garment with darted and separated bust. Delineator, March 1929.

Foundation garment with darted and separated bust. Delineator, March 1929.

By 1931, you could buy this Smart Model “co-ed” foundation with “new bustline, no boning” from a Sears catalog for $1.98.

From Stella Blum's Everyday Fashions of the 1930s. Please do not copy this image.

From Stella Blum’s Everyday Fashions of the 1930s. Please do not copy this image.

This is part 4 of a series about undergarments in the 1920s: to read “Brassieres, Bandeaux and Bust Flatteners” (click here), “Underpinning Twenties Fashion: Girdles and Corsets” (click here), “Garters, Flappers & Rolled Stockings” (click here.)

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Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Accessory Patterns, Bras, Corselettes, Corsets, Corsets & Corselettes, Girdles, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Underthings, Hosiery, Corsets, etc, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

Drum Majorettes, 1950

A treasure trove of McCall store catalogs from the forties and fifties has brought back a lot of memories for me.  I haven’t thought about baton twirling in decades, but McCall made patterns for Drum Majorettes sized for Misses, for Girls 4 to 12, and even for dolls.

McCall Pattern #1553: The “Twirly Girls” Lead the Parade

McCall pattern #1553: The "twirly girls" lead the parade. Store Catalog, Dec. 1950.

McCall pattern #1553: The “twirly girls” lead the parade. Store Catalog, Dec. 1950.

mccall dec 1950 top 96 dpi text 300 1553982

A Drum Majorette Costume for Little Girls, McCall Pattern 1546

McCall girls' pattern #1546. Store catalog, Dec. 1950.

McCall girls’ pattern #1546. Store catalog, Dec. 1950.

mccall dec 1950 text top 96 dpi text 1546 girl984“Your little baton-twirler will be the big attraction in the parade when she steps jauntily along in front of the band in her glamorous satin costume…!” My complete lack of interest did not prevent my mother from enrolling me in “Tap, Ballet, and Acrobatics” classes at an early age, but a lack of coordination got me out of baton twirling classes after just a few weeks. I got to watch these twirlers in the 1952 Fourth of July Parade, but I didn’t have to be one — a lucky escape for the bystanders.

"Twirlers" in the Fourth of July Parade, California, 1952.

“Twirlers” in the Fourth of July Parade, California, 1952.

Their uniforms are sleeveless, but otherwise resemble pattern 1553, although they were probably ordered from a uniform company.

A Drum Majorette Doll Pattern, McCall #1561

McCall doll dress pattern #1561, store catalog, Dec. 1950.

McCall doll dress pattern #1561, store catalog, Dec. 1950.

mccall dec doll top text 1950 text top 96 dpi 987This pattern — “just like the misses’ and girls’ majorette costumes” — is made for “Toni” dolls, in sizes 14 or 16 inches high. Toni dolls were related to Toni home permanents. I had a Toni doll; you could set her hair with curlers and a sugar-water solution. It was not really my idea of a good time, and eventually a crisp sugar buildup looked a bit like doll dandruff.

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Filed under 1940s-1950s, Children's Vintage styles, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Uniforms and Work Clothes, Vintage patterns

Finding an Old Friend: McCall Sunsuit #1030

What are the chances of seeing a child’s sunsuit pattern from the 1940s and finding a photo of myself wearing that exact outfit? It happened.

McCall Sunsuit pattern 1030, catalog, December 1946. Girl wearing sunsuit, circa 1949.

McCall Sunsuit pattern #1030, pattern catalog, December 1946. Witness2fashion wearing sunsuit, circa 1949.

I remembered that picture of myself wearing a sunsuit because the pose — so coy! — is so cringe-worthy. But it was quite a surprise to find that it not only resembles the sunsuit pattern, it is identical except for the choice of fabric.

McCall Sunsuit pattern 1030, McCall store catalogs, late 1940s.

McCall Sunsuit pattern 1030, McCall store catalogs, late 1940s.

I have seen this pattern, #1030, in three McCall Needlework Catalogues (December 1946, May 1950, and November 1950.)  Like most clothing for children, styles remained constant over several years. It qualified for the Needlework catalogues because of its applique trim.McCall pattern 1030 text960

At first I thought I was wearing a different sunbonnet than the one shown, but another photo, although overexposed, shows the same squarish shape:

A squarish bonnet is included in pattern 1030.

A squarish bonnet is included in pattern 1030.

You can see the bonnet's dark band on this photo.

You can see the bonnet’s dark band on this photo.

I have no memory of this playsuit. I don’t think many of my clothes were home-made, although my mother was a good seamstress. I would guess that it was a gift from my grandmother or my aunt; both of them had friends who sewed very professionally. Posing in a new outfit was a family tradition. My mother — whose friends called her ‘glamourpuss,’ loved the camera. I usually hated being photographed (note the resentful scowl in one photo) and still do.

"Glamourpuss" posing in a new dress, 1932. There sems to be a Marlene Dietrich influence....

“Glamourpuss” posing in a new dress, 1932. There sems to be a Marlene Dietrich influence….

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Filed under 1930s-1940s, 1940s-1950s, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Sportswear, Vintage Garments: The Real Thing, Vintage patterns, vintage photographs

1950 Aprons for Barbecues and a Happy Marriage

McCall's Apron Patterns for Men and Women, store catalog,

McCall’s Apron Patterns for Men and Women, store catalog, 1950.

McCall’s featured these apron sets for men and women in at least two 1950 catalogs. I’m not sure how many men barbecued while wearing suits, but they certainly barbecued while smoking cigarettes. (See below.) The pattern on the left, #1481, is described as “Mr. & Mrs. Happy Marriage Aprons.”

Mr. & Mrs. Happy Marriage Aprons

McCall's apron pattern 1481, catalog, May 1950.

McCall’s apron pattern #1481, catalog, May 1950.

happy marriage text953

The happy marriage aprons show the husband doing the grocery shopping, washing the dishes, and mopping the floor. The wife does the cooking, the ironing, and the dusting. Not a bad division of labor, for 1950! (Uh-oh. These aprons “will amuse friends, each other.” I bet a lot of them were wedding shower presents, intended to get a laugh.)

Weiner Dog Barbecue Apron Set

McCall's Men's and Women's apron set pattern #1515, from store catalog, May 1950.

McCall’s Men’s and Women’s Barbecue Apron Set pattern #1515, from store catalog, May 1950.

weiner dog text p 22“Mrs. looks so barbe-cute in hers, with appliqued dachshunds, a toasting hot dog. And the pig chef appliqued on man’s apron will barbe-cure Mr. of hot coal shyness.” Because of strong anti-German sentiment during World War I (and WW II), dachshunds were sometimes called “liberty” dogs, “weiner” dogs, or “sausage” dogs. [cf. “freedom fries” nine decades later.]  In the fifties, my family called dachshunds “weenie dogs.” This 1950 catalog indulged in a lot of puns when it came to aprons and tea-towel embroidery transfers.

An Oh “So-Mannish Apron”

McCall's Apron Set Pattern # 1319 for Men and Women, store catalog, May 1950.

McCall’s Apron Set Pattern # 1319 for Men and Women, store catalog, May 1950.

chef and waitress aprons text1950“Mr. Never-go-near-the-kitchen will hustle to help if he’s wearing his own so-mannish apron.”

French Chef Embroidery Pattern

The McCall’s Needlework Catalog also offered a set of 8″ embroidery transfers suitable for dish towels or pot holders. [Big dish towels made from bleached flour sacks were often embroidered and sold at fund-raising bazaars. I’m still using some that I inherited 30 years ago; thousands of trips through the wash have made them lint-free and very absorbent — not at all like the small, not-very-absorbent ‘dish towels’ made from looped towel fabric that are common today.]

French chef embroidery transfer pattern #1055, offered in McCall's  catalog; May, 1950.

French chef embroidery transfer pattern #1055, offered in McCall’s catalog; May, 1950.

A set of big dish towels embroidered with these charming, cartoonish French chefs would still make a great gift! However, the copyright is probably still held by McCall’s, now part of Butterick, so I do not recommend making them for sale! Bon appetit!1055 french chefs embroidery text

 

 

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Filed under 1940s-1950s, 1950s-1960s, Accessory Patterns, Uniforms and Work Clothes, Vintage Accessories

Women Warned About “Bicycle Face” in the 1890s

This young woman is not suffering from “Bicycle Face.”

Bicycling costume, 1890, from Jenness-Miller Magazine. Photo courtesy RememberedSummers.

Bicycling costume, 1890, from Jenness-Miller Magazine. Photo courtesy RememberedSummers.

Nicole Hollander, author of the Sylvia cartoon strip, blogged about a wonderful article by Joseph Stromberg at Vox this morning: The Nineteenth Century Health Scare That Told Women to Worry About “Bicycle Face. To read it, click here.

Alarmed by the freedom women found in cycling — they could journey more than a few miles from their homes — unaccompanied! They could bicycle to work or to school! — some doctors wrote about a new malady which might permanently affect women’s faces.

“Over-exertion, the upright position on the wheel, and the unconscious effort to maintain one’s balance tend to produce a wearied and exhausted ‘bicycle face.’ ” — Literary Digest, 1895.

Bicycle face could make a woman “flushed, but usually pale, often with lips more or less drawn, and the beginning of dark shadows under the eyes, and always with an expression of weariness.” Another source described “a hard, clenched jaw, and bulging eyes.”

Funny: I would think that the usual routine of a turn-of-the century woman — rising before dawn to build a fire in the stove, toting heavy coal scuttles, baking bread for the day, boiling gallons of water to do the laundry and lugging huge washtubs full of wet sheets out to the yard to hang them on the line, all while nursing a baby and looking after one or two toddlers, keeping an eye on the stove, and wondering whether her husband would come home drunk or sober — would also produce a face that was flushed or “pale, often with lips more or less drawn, and the beginning of dark shadows under the eyes, and always with an expression of weariness.” Not to mention a “hard, clenched jaw.”

I urge you to read Joseph Stromberg’s article. It’s researched in several sources and includes a Google graph of when the phrase was most popular — from 1895 to 2000. (I hope all the occurances after 1930 are like this one — references to the previous articles!)

Luckily, women were not discouraged from cycling:

Girl on Bike, circa 1910. Photo courtesy of Remembered Summers.

Girl on bike, California, circa 1910. Photo courtesy of Remembered Summers.

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Filed under 1870s to 1900s fashions, 1900s to 1920s, Children's Vintage styles, Musings, Sportswear, vintage photographs

Recycling, Paisley, and Shawls

A pink paisley printed dress, from Elegance, Fall 1965-66.

A pink paisley printed dress, from Elegance, Fall 1965-66.

I was a sixties girl. Paisley patterns were worn by hippies and Vogue readers alike.

Indian textiles on the Beatles. Ringo, at right, is wearing a paisley print shirt. Public domain photo from www.brandeis.edu

Indian textiles on the Beatles. Ringo, at right, is wearing a paisley print shirt. Public domain photo from http://www.brandeis.edu

In the 1960s, Western manufacturers adapted the pattern into double-knits, like this jacket. . .

A paisley knit suit jacket, Elegance magazine, Fall 1965-66.

A paisley knit suit jacket, Elegance magazine, Fall 1965-66.

. . . and created subtler prints based on Indian designs, like this light pink wool.

pink paisley close upI owned several paisley dresses, with patterns ranging from ‘dark and subtle’ to ‘psychedelic and enormous.’

Simplicity pattern 6729 for a Jiffy dress, illustrated in Paisley on the left. 1966

Simplicity pattern 6729 for a Jiffy dress, illustrated in Paisley on the left. 1966

But I never made the connection between the pattern I called “paisley” and the Scottish cloth-manufacturing town of Paisley until this month. This was a good month for learning about paisley. I had been reading a book about Jane Austen, which included an illustration of a “paisley” shawl; then I read a magazine from 1917 which showed examples of clothing made out of old paisley shawls.

A coat, hat, & bag, and a dress made from old paisley shawls. Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

A coat, hat, & bag, made from one Victorian  shawl, and a dress made from another old paisley shawl. Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

To me, it seemed like sacrilege to chop a huge, [already] 60-year old wool or cashmere shawl . . .

A cashmere shaw, mid-1800s, from Wikipedia.

A cashmere shaw, mid-1800s, from Wikipedia.

. . . into ugly 1917 clothing, but, of course, such fabric recycling is an old tradition. The Metropolitan Museum has examples of Victorian Paisley shawls converted into mid-Victorian bathrobes, and dolman jackets, 1920s coats, and rather chic 1920s suits.

Finding the History of Paisley Patterns and Paisley Shawls

I found two excellent articles online about the history of the paisley pattern (called “boteh” in India) as it was adopted and adapted for mass manufacture during the 1800s. Threads of History gives a marvellous illustrated history of the development of both the shawl and the Paisley/boteh pattern (click here.) In Victoriana, Meg Andrews also discusses the fashion history of paisley, with many different illustrations, and explains why this luxury item eventually went out of style and into attics. (click here.)

The Real Jane Austen and Her Shawl

Rectangular Indian shawls were fashionable in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Image from Wikipedia.

Rectangular Indian shawls were fashionable in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Image from Wikipedia.

I recently enjoyed reading The Real Jane Austen: A Life in Small Things, by Paula Byrne. This is not a conventional birth-to-death biography, but an exploration of Jane Austen’s world via several objects connected with her daily life: her portable writing desk, a silhouette of her family, a topaz necklace purchased for her by one of her sailor brothers, etc.  Chapter Two uses an East Indian Shawl as a springboard into her family connections with India, trade, and a family scandal (Like her character, Emma, Austen knew a young woman born out of wedlock. In Austen’s case, it was a near relation whom she knew quite well.) You can read detailed and very informative reviews of The Real Jane Austen in The Telegraph (click here), or by [Dickens expert and actor] Simon Callow (click here.)

Paisley Shawls Recycled, 1917

Having just read Paula Byrne’s Austen book, I had paisley shawls on my mind when I found these ‘recycled’ paisley shawls in the Ladies’ Home Journal, 1917:

A coat, hat, & bag, and a dress made from old paisley shawls. Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

It took one shawl to make this coat, hat, & bag;  a dress made from another Victorian Paisley shawl.  Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

When the United States entered World War I, in 1917, women expected fabric shortages. Women’s magazines like Delineator and Ladies’ Home Journal, both in the business of selling sewing patterns, began to write about ways that new clothing could be made from materials on hand. Women had always utilized dresses from the attic, and their own family’s used clothing, for children’s clothes, quilts, etc. (A bodice from the 1850s or 1860s is still relatively easy to find; finding an 1860s bodice with its matching skirt is much harder, since the skirts contained several yards of easily re-useable fabric.) Wool and silk Paisley shawls were among the garments frequently remade into robes, dresses, handbags and 1920s suits and coats.  (You can see the Metropolitan Museum’s collection of paisley shawls, and clothing made from shawls, by clicking here.)

More Creative Recycling, 1917

The Vintage Traveler has written about remade shawls and vintage clothing. Collectors of vintage clothing will probably cringe at this chiffon gown (pictured at right) converted into a couple of blouses:

A "terribly old-fashioned"  chiffon evening dress converted into a blouse. Ladies Home Journal, 1917

A “terribly old-fashioned” chiffon  dress converted into a blouse. Ladies Home Journal, 1917

But I give full marks for creativity to this handbag — made from a scrap of black velvet and a pair of old, long, white leather gloves with black stitching!

Handbag made from old gloves, Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

Handbag made from old gloves, Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

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Filed under 1860s -1870s fashions, 1870s to 1900s fashions, 1920s, 1960s-1970s, Vintage Accessories