Serendipity in Hats, 1920s

I was visiting the fabulous University of North Texas online fashion collection, aimlessly browsing through the 1920s, when I found a hat that looked familiar.

This pattern illustration from Butterick’s Delineator magazine was fresh in my memory because I’ve been writing about tam-o’-shanters (right) from the mid 1920s.

Delineator, March 1924, page 33.

Delineator, March 1924, page 33.

But it’s the strange, turban-like hat on the left that I found in the UNT collection.1924 march p 33 odd hatslike U of Tx

Click here to see the Paris hat, by Agnes, that probably inspired Butterick’s illustrator. The hat in the UNT fashion collection does not have a tassel. The style is called a calotte. 

I was lucky enough to get a tour of the UNT’s mind-blowing Fashion Collection many years ago. Texas has a lot of millionaires. The wives of these oilmen are part of international society, and they bought a lot of couture — so much, that they donated their “old clothes” to the UNT collection. On my physical tour of the collection, I saw suits by Givenchy, Yves Saint Laurent, and Chanel, among many others, often accompanied by all the original accessories worn with them, and even the illustrated swatch books that were sent to the couturiers’ regular customers, generous donors with names like Getty and Bass…. If you don’t already know about the Fashion Collection at University of North Texas, this might be a good time to pay a digital visit. Click here. When you find an item you like, click the “All Views” icon to the right (if present) to see more photos, labels, etc. This site is also listed under “Sites with Great Information” at the right of this blog. Enjoy your trip!

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2 Comments

Filed under 1920s, Exhibitions & Museums, Hats, Resources for Costumers, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs, Vintage Garments: The Real Thing

2 responses to “Serendipity in Hats, 1920s

  1. Currently, there’s an exhibit at UNT of wedding dresses through the years. I plan to go when I have a chance. It runs until October 24, 2014. They have a great collection of garments there and I love that they share it with the public in person and online!

  2. Pingback: More McCall Hats and Bags, 1946 | witness2fashion

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