Men’s Necktie Patterns, 1941 to 1950

Necktie Patterns, December 1946. McCall #907 (left) and #1220 (center & right). Store catalog.

Necktie Patterns, December 1946. McCall #907 (left) and #1220 (center & right). Store catalog.

These tie patterns were still in the catalogs four years later,  although the illlustrations changed. Presumably, some of these fabric suggestions went out of style.

McCall Necktie Pattern #907,  from 1941

McCall # 907 as shown in December, 1946, catalog.

McCall # 907 as shown in December, 1946, catalog.

Pattern #907 was not new in 1946; by then the catalog’s number sequence had reached the 1300s. The Commercial Pattern Archive dates it to 1941. In 1941, the illustration included two more ties on the left. (click here.) [Edited to correct link 8/13/14] By the end of 1950, the small foulard pattern on the left (above) had also disappeared.

"You can make his ties," McCall #907 in November 1950 catalog.

“You can make his ties,” McCall #907 in November 1950 catalog.

Note that there are two lengths available, “Regulation” 47 inches and a shorter tie, 45 inches long. Men’s waistbands rose and fell during the 1930s and 1940s, and tie lengths changed with them.

Trousers, 1930, from a menswear catalog. Courtesy of Remembered Summers.

Trousers, 1939, from a menswear catalog. Courtesy of Remembered Summers.

Extremely high waists and exaggerated shoulder padding, 1939.

Extremely high waists and exaggerated shoulder padding, 1939. Image courtesy Remembered Summers.

McCall Necktie Pattern #1220, from 1945

McCall's #1220, December 1946 store catalog.

McCall’s #1220, December 1946 store catalog. CoPA dates this tie to 1945.

“Notice the nice wide ends on the long tie!”  The illustration for McCall #1220 also changed between 1946 and 1950; these “loud” ties on the left disappeared . . .

dec 1946 1220 top of pg022. . . leaving these more conservative styles in 1950.

McCall #1220, as illustrated in November 1950 store catalog.

McCall #1220, as illustrated in November 1950 store catalog.

“Choose prints he likes. Dress fabrics, suitably designed, are good. ” This tie is 48 inches long.

McCall Necktie pattern #1517, from 1950

McCall #1517, May 1950 store catalog.

McCall #1517, May 1950 store catalog.

may 1950 1517 text025

This 1950 tie is 50 to 51 inches long (as compared to # 907, 45 or 47 inches long in 1941) and is designed for either a specially printed quarter block panel of tie material or “printed or plain silk dress material.”  The vogue for “illustrated” ties has arrived:

Necktie pattern #1517, November 1950.

Necktie pattern #1517, November 1950.

Compared to some ties from 1950, the one with the birch trees (right) is almost tasteful!

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3 Comments

Filed under 1940s-1950s, Accessory Patterns, Menswear

3 responses to “Men’s Necktie Patterns, 1941 to 1950

  1. Well, as far as I’m concerned ties should be limited to geometric designs. But it’s interesting to see how many weren’t! Those people who say that men’s clothing never changes should take a look at the shape of those late thirties suits!

  2. When I was a little girl in the 50s, I was crazy about horses. I loved a necktie my father wore; it was maroon/brown, with the head of a palomino hand-painted on it. Luckily, my father was self-employed. I don’t think he could have gotten a job as a banker while wearing that tie.

  3. I have two 1950s ties with Scottie dogs! The choices were endless.

    Interesting that the fabric for ties was being made for and marketed to home sewers.

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