Updates to Recent Posts

I inadvertently published two posts on the same day — oops, and apologies, because they were both rather long.

I intended to publish the post on the possible return of High/Low Hems on Sunday (today), when I could have added this photo of a dress I saw Wednesday in the window at an Express store.

A high-in-front-low-in-back dress I photographed in the window of an Express store. Sept. 2015.

A high-in-front-low-in-back dress I photographed in the window of an Express store. Sept. 2015.

Click here to see it at the Express website. It is even sheer and “flowy” like its 1929 counterparts. Express sells another dress with an opaque, high-in-front upper skirt and a sheer lace long hem (click here.)

It was also nice to see a photograph of a high/low robe de style on the Glamourdaze site that was almost identical to a Butterick pattern I had written about earlier:

Butterick robe de style with sheer scalloped hem, pattern 6935 from 1926. Delineator.

Butterick robe de style with sheer scalloped hem, pattern 6935 from 1926. Delineator.

Click here to see a photograph on Glamourdaze of a very similar dress worn by actress Margaret Livingston in 1926. Like the Butterick dress on the right, several inches of the scalloped hem are transparent.

More about Victorian Working Women and the strange romance of Arthur Munby and Hannah Cullwick :

In the book Munby, Man of Two Worlds, I found this 1874 photograph of his wife, Hannah Cullwick, maid of all work, looking very much like a distinguished lady. It was taken after her marriage, showing how she dressed when she traveled abroad with her husband.

Hannah Cullwick dressed for travel after her marriage to Arthur Munby, 1874. From Munby by Derek Hudson.

Hannah Cullwick dressed as a lady after her marriage to Arthur Munby, 1874. From Munby by Derek Hudson.

Ladies wore gloves; servants did not. Hannah’s muscular and work-stained hands were a problem; Munby had to buy her the largest gloves made for women — size 8; sometimes she had to wear men’s gloves.

Hanna Cullwick, maid of all work. Her hands are strong, work-worn, and stained. From Victorian Working Women.

Hanna Cullwick, maid of all work. Circa 1860. Her hands are strong, work-worn, and stained. From Victorian Working Women.

 

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Filed under 1860s -1870s fashions, 1920s, A Costumers' Bookshelf, Uniforms and Work Clothes

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