Thanksgiving Greetings

Ford Automobile Advertisement, Delineator magazine, October 1924.

Woman Gathering Autumn Leaves. Ford Automobile Advertisement, Delineator magazine, October 1924.

Some of the happiest hours of my life were spent “rambling” on public footpaths in England, or driving cross country, like these two women. We didn’t dress in riding breeches, of course — our clothes were more comfortable. But there is something to be said for the text of this 1924 advertisement. I’m certainly thankful for the freedom to go where I like, dressed as I like, alone if I like.

Freedom for the woman who owns a Ford." Ad, Delineator magazine, Oct. 1924.

“Freedom for the woman who owns a Ford.” Ad, Delineator magazine, Oct. 1924.

“To own a Ford car is to be free to venture into new and untried places. It is to answer every challenge of Nature’s charms, safely, surely, and without fatigue. Where a narrow lane invites or a steep hill promises a surprise beyond, a Ford will take you there and back, in comfort, trouble-free.  Off and away in this obedient, ever-ready car, women may “recharge the batteries” of tired bodies, newly inspired for the day’s work.”  — Ford Closed Cars advertisement, Ford Motor Company, Detroit, Michigan. 1924.

Women who live in the United States take our freedom for granted — to drive, to work, to dress comfortably, to vote, to own property, to attend school, to travel unaccompanied, to enjoy solitude — but not every woman has it, even in the 21st century.  For those of us who do, personal freedom (and men of integrity, like this father) are blessings to consider on Thanksgiving. I’ll be remembering all the good people, men and women, who have made my life of physical and intellectual freedom possible.

Ford ad aimed at women, Oct. 1924. Delineator magazine.

Ford ad aimed at women, Oct. 1924. Delineator magazine.

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3 Comments

Filed under 1920s, Musings, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Sportswear, Women in Trousers

3 responses to “Thanksgiving Greetings

  1. And she’s wearing pants (well, jodhpurs). Another sign of fashion freedom in the 1920s.

  2. I love this! It is a great depiction of how women in the early 20s were beginning to dress for auto travel.

    • My mother had an old pair of jodhpurs, which she wore on motor trips to the mountains in the 1920’s or 30’s. She made me wear them for my first horseback riding lesson, which a was rare and costly extravagance — probably my birthday gift. My mother and her friends had worn jodhpurs whenever they drove into the Sierras to play in the snow. They were incredibly heavy wool twill with a jillion buttons and took a long time to put on. I almost immediately outgrew them and was glad for an excuse to wear jeans instead. (This was in the early 1950’s.)

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