Smart Dresses for Summer, 1928

This is a full page article from Delineator, June 1928. Seven Butterick patterns are illustrated in full color, as if the seven models were on a rather formal family outing to a park.

"New Smartness," Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

“New Smartness,” Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

The blouson effect, with a wide, tight hip band — called a girdle — was chic in 1928.  If you want to make a dress like this, attaching it to an underbodice will suspend the weight of the skirt from your shoulders, keeping the blouson in place.

Closer views, followed by their pattern descriptions:

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, 2026 and 2071. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Pattern descriptions and alternate views:

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2087, and 2026. June, 1928.

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

The printed chiffon dress is an afternoon dress, worn for dressier occasions than shopping. This pattern could be purchased for bust measurements up to 46 inches. The corresponding hip measurement would be about 49″.

2074 text

The pink dress could have long or short sleeves, and be gathered or pleated.

2078 text

The print dress at far right is surprisingly “an afternoon frock of the more formal type” made in silk crepe, satin or rayon. More formal than chiffon?

2026 text

These two dresses are for girls. The smocked dress on the left could also be made in a long sleeved version. Since smocking requires time-consuming hand sewing, machine shirring was also a possibility.

Closer views of girls' dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

Closer views of girls’ dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

2071 2065 text

Butterick 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

Butterick dresses 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

I suspect that many women made this print dress without the cape in back. Border print fabrics gave 1920’s dresses like this one their impact, although solids and small prints could also be used.

2024 text

No. 2068 was a pattern that could be used for day (with long or short sleeves) or modified for evening wear by making it sleeveless, with a deeper cut neckline and armholes.

2068 text

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for feminine curves. 1928.

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for (modest) feminine curves. 1928.

The lines of tucks on the bodice front (right) remind us that by 1928 breasts were no longer being flattened by young women, although older women might continue to wear a foundation like this “Bien Jolie corsette.”

Ad for a "Bien Jolie" ["Very Pretty"] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926.

Ad for an “exquisite” “Bien Jolie” [“Very Pretty”] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926. A garment like this shapes the body like casing shapes a sausage.

 You can read more about corsets and corsolettes by clicking here. For bust flatteners and bandeaux, click here.

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5 Comments

Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Uncategorized, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

5 responses to “Smart Dresses for Summer, 1928

  1. I’ve looked at a lot of 1920s dresses over the years. You do see the cape effect from time to time, but it is usually shorter than what is shown in these illustrations. Sometimes the upper arms are covered as well.

  2. I can’t help but notice how much this era influenced those 80’s dresses with hip sashes (Vogue pattern 1510 and Butterick 5769 among many others).

  3. Pingback: Butterick Forecast Wardrobe for Spring, 1928 | witness2fashion

  4. Pingback: Modart Corset Ad, March 1928 | witness2fashion

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