Chin-Chokers, Accessories to Knit or Crochet, 1930s

This peculiar fishnet “scarf” caught my eye. It’s just one of the knitted or crocheted dresses, suits, and accessories so popular in the 1930s.

This "gilet" was made from a Woman's Home Companion knitting pattern, March 1936.

This knotted “gilet” was made from a Woman’s Home Companion pattern, March 1936.

Worn over a blouse, the gilet has a belt or ribbon threaded through the mesh at waist and neckline.

Detail of gilet, Woman's Home Companion, p. 91, March 1936.

Detail of gilet, Woman’s Home Companion, p. 91, March 1936.

500 gilet text WHC 1936 mar p 91 gilet to knit or crochet scarf btm text

If you found this vintage  accessory without its ribbons, you might well think it was a wool anti-macassar or table decoration.

A square scarf and a high necked “tippet” were also described.

Crocheted scarf to make, Woman's Home Companion, March 1936.

Crocheted scarf to make, Woman’s Home Companion, March 1936.

A knitted "tippet" from Woman's Home Companion, March 1936.

A knitted “tippet” from Woman’s Home Companion, March 1936.

This “Swagger Set” could be made from Dennison Crepe:

Ad from Delineator, Feb. 1934. Dennison Crepe.

Ad from Delineator, Feb. 1934. Dennison Crepe for a “Swagger Set” of crocheted collar, cuffs and belt.

As far as I can tell, the Dennison Company made crepe paper, not fabrics, and, in the twenties and thirties, encouraged its use in Halloween and masquerade party costumes. [And, according to this ad, in hats and sweaters!] Dennison published magazines with instructions for making party decorations and other craft projects from Dennison Crepe; a search for “Dennison Crepe 1930s” will lead you to many images like this one.  [Even if the paper was flame resistant, the very idea of combining Halloween pumpkins, candles, and paper costumes is horrifying to me. I once saw an exhibit of theatrical costumes made from black plastic trash bags. As an art concept, interesting; as something for an actor to wear, utterly irresponsible.]

The Bucilla yarn and thread company sold kits like this:

A kit from Bucilla, sold through the Berth Robert catalog, June 1924.

A kit from Bucilla, sold through the Berth Robert catalog, June 1924. Correction: S/B 1934. (Edited 7/25/16)

The interest in collars and cuffs which would transform the look of a simple dress or sweater was part of the Depression Era need to make a varied work wardrobe out of just one or two dresses. I’ve written several posts about this need; click here  (One Good Dress in the 1930s) or here (Button-on Patterns from the Thirties).

This pretty crochet sweater was also a do-it-yourself kit from Bucilla:

A sweater from a kit, Bucilla, sold through the Berth Robert catalog, June 1934.

A sweater from a kit, Bucilla, sold through the Berth Robert catalog, June 1934.

Brief Digression: The Berth Robert Company sold clothing and “semi-finished” clothes for women who were willing to sew dresses, but not to cut them out and do the more difficult sewing tasks like pintucks.

Berth Robert semi-made dress ad, WHC, Sept. 1934.

Berth Robert semi-made dress ad, WHC, Sept. 1934.

Click here to read more about semi-finished dresses.

The Woman’s Home Companion even encouraged its readers to knit a negligee:

Hand Knitted negligee from Woman's Home Companion, Nov. 1937.

Hand knitted negligee pattern from Woman’s Home Companion, Nov. 1937. Scroll down for an image of the full text.

WHC pattern CK-402 for a lacy knit negligee. 1937.

WHC pattern CK-402 for a lacy knit negligee. 1937.

Detail of WHC knit pattern CK-40

Detail of WHC knit pattern CK-402, 1937.

500 text WHC 1937 nov p 86 knit negligee

The petal-shaped ruffles, the sash, and the lining were not knitted; they were made from sheer georgette fabric.

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under 1930s, Accessory Patterns, Nightclothes and Robes, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Vintage Accessories

3 responses to “Chin-Chokers, Accessories to Knit or Crochet, 1930s

  1. I’ve taken up knitting in an amateurish way and am constantly amazed at the high price of good yarn. Perhaps these thrifty Depression era women were making accessories out of yarn from old projects? Or was yarn comparatively cheaper then?

  2. Pingback: More Knits From the Thirties | witness2fashion

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