More Knits From the Thirties

A sweater to knit, January 1936, Delineator. Note the very 1930's toggle buttons.

A sweater to knit, January 1936, Delineator, page 31. Note the big, very 1930’s buttons.

I know nothing about knitting. However, in case you do, here are some more knitted fashions from the thirties — and a surprise.

A suit to knit offered by Delineator magazine (Butterick) in January, 1936.

A three-piece woman’s suit to knit offered by Delineator magazine (Butterick) in January, 1936. Page 31.

It has delightful details, like the knitted-in center front skirt panel:

Detail of knitted suit, 1936.

Detail of knitted suit, 1936. It’s a very snug fit.

How to order instructions for Delineator's suit No. 119.

How to order instructions for Delineator’s suit No. 119, page 31 , January 1936.

The Woman’s Home Companion also offered knitting patterns; this slim two-piece knit is another from 1936:

A knitted two-piece dress pattern from Woman's Home Companion, Feb. 1936, p. 55.

A knitted two-piece dress pattern from Woman’s Home Companion, Feb. 1936, p. 55.

The knitting stitch looks familiar; “frosty cotton yarn” was recommended for this outfit.

Information for WHC knitting instructions, Feb. 1936.

Information for WHC knitting instructions, Feb. 1936. Readers had to write to the Woman’s Home Companion and request number CK-382. It was free, except for three cents postage.

This “dress” pattern from Woman’s Home Companion was a bit different; it offered a paper pattern, not just instructions.

Knitted dress pattern No. 6053, from Woman's Home Companion, February 1937.

Knitted dress pattern No. 6053, from Woman’s Home Companion, February 1937.

Information that accompanied the article about Knitted dress 6053. 1937.

Information that accompanied the article about Knitted Dress No. 6053. 1937.

Was a hand-knitted dress like this stylish or dowdy? I believe knits were in style, mostly because of this ad from an upscale, custom corset company:

"Yes, you can wear knitted suits" says this ad from the Spirella custom corset company. Ladies Home Journal, July 1936.

“Yes, you can wear knitted suits” says this ad from the Spirella custom corset company. Ladies Home Journal, July 1936.

If the desire to wear knitted suits and dresses was a selling point for foundation garments, there must have been many women who wanted to wear knits.

Sweater Girls

Woman in white sweater, Woman's Home Companion story illustration, April 1936.

Woman in white sweater, many-gored skirt, belt, hat, scarf, and gloves. Story illustration, Woman’s Home Companion, April 1936.

In 1937, teen-aged actress Lana Turner was dubbed “The Sweater Girl,” and that’s what her New York Times obituary called her in 1995. (She was not really discovered at Schwab’s soda fountain, however….) But the sweater and skirt combination was definitely a popular look for schoolgirls and other women in the nineteen thirties.

A sweater to knit, September, 1934, p. 63.

A sweater to knit, September, 1934, p. 63. Delineator. Decorative wooden buttons trim the collar and the neck opening. Viyella yarn was recommended.

A description of the sweater and skirt from Delineator, Sept. 1934, p. 63.

A description of the sweater and skirt from Delineator, Sept. 1934, p. 63.

More sweaters to knit — one of them very jacket-like, were featured in the August, 1934, Ladies’ Home Journal:

tops to knit, Ladies' Home Journal, Aug. 1934.

Tops to knit, Ladies’ Home Journal, Aug. 1934. Illustration by Dilys Wall. Two of these sweaters have  a diagonal rib.

Raglan-sleeved sweater to knit, Ladies Home Journal, Aug. 1934, p. 37.

Raglan-sleeved sweater to knit, Ladies’ Home Journal, Aug. 1934, p. 37. More big, 1930’s decorative buttons.

“A grand knit blouse for your tweed suit. Its square neck and raglan sleeves are important. We’ve made it in a little checkerboard stitch in Bear Brand or Bucilla crepe boucle or Shetland, if you wish.”

Also from 1934 are these manufactured sweaters from the Berth Robert catalog:

Ready-to-wear knit tops from the Berth Robert catalog for June, 1934.

Ready-to-wear knit tops from the Berth Robert catalog for June, 1934.

Costumers on a tight budget may be glad to know that the twin set was already established in the nineteen thirties, although finding one with set-in pockets may not be easy. The elaborate collar on number J 12 is very “thirties.”

The same Delineator article that showed the snug, three-piece suit (shown earlier) also had photos of the cable-knit that begins this post and this short-sleeved cotton sweater to knit yourself:

A knit pattern from Delineator, January 1936, p. 30.

A knit pattern from Delineator, January 1936, p. 30.

A pattern for this angora sweater was also offered.

An angora sweater to knit, Delineator, 1936.

A yellow angora sweater to knit, Delineator, 1936. It has big navy buttons and a “fringed necktie.” No. 117.

1936 jan p 31 knitting angora 117 text

High school and college girls were especially likely to wear sweaters.

"To wear on campus;" Woman's Home Companion, Aug. 1937.

“To Wear on Campus;” Woman’s Home Companion, Aug. 1937. Note the snaffle bit belt, which could be worn over the sweater.

A sweater set for the college wardrobe, froom "Styles in Stores, Woman's Home Companion, January 1936.

A sweater set and many-gored skirt, from “Styles in Stores,” Woman’s Home Companion, January 1936. The cardigan is checkered and the coordinating “blouse” is striped.

WHC 1936 jan p 55 styles in stores sweater set text

Part sweater, part weskit, and part jacket, with two diagonally set pockets, this one really appeals to me:

A sort of vest/weskit with knitted sleeves and back, ready-to-wear from November 1937. Woman's Home Companion.

A sort of vest/weskit with knitted sleeves and back, this was ready-to-wear from November 1937. Woman’s Home Companion. The front was duvetyne, a brushed wool fabric. It “may be worn for winter sports or after as a topper with slacks.”

But my very favorite 1930’s “sweater set” is deceptive:

A plaid twin set for the college wardrobe. Ready-to-wear from stores in September 1926.

A plaid twin set for the college wardrobe. Ready-to-wear from stores in September 1936.  Surprise:  It’s not a sweater set.

I love the contrast binding, the 3-button collar, the bias pocket detail on cardigan and blouse, the buttoned wrists….  but this is not a sweater set. It’s made of plaid wool flannel.

WHC 1936 sept p 59 college wardrobe text plaid twin set

I wonder;  Was “Twique” prounounced “Twee-kay” to rhyme with piqué?

 

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under 1930s, Corsets, Foundation Garments, Girdles, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Sportswear, Underthings, Hosiery, Corsets, etc

3 responses to “More Knits From the Thirties

  1. Lovely, fascinating post. Thanks!

  2. Some beautiful outfits here! I particularly love the “Suit to Knit” from 1936 and the boat neck raglan sleeve sweater. Was yarn comparatively less expensive in the thirties, I wonder. These days it costs a lot to knit a sweater from nice yarn.

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