Blouses for Evening, November 1936

Butterick patterns chosen for the Woman’s Home Companion were almost always cost-conscious. These “Gay Blouses” featured in November of 1936 are illustrated in evening materials, to be worn with a long velveteen skirt. They require very little material — as little as one yard and a quarter.

Make a Gay Blouse from a Little Material," Woman's Home Companion, November 1936, p. 80

Make a Gay Blouse From a Little Material,” Woman’s Home Companion, November 1936, p. 80. Illustration signed McCuskin.

“How would you like to wear something glamorous and different to your next theater party or concert? If so, here is a practical suggestion. Make one of these formal blouses. You can do it in short order for the patterns are easy. And what is more, they require very little material. A remnant as short as one and one quarter or no longer than two yards is all you need for any one of them in size thirty-six.

“Here is a chance to indulge your taste for the most luxurious metal cloth, the softest satin, the richest velvet or the newest cloque. Any material shows to advantage in these simple designs.”

Companion-Butterick pattern 7074, dated 1936.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7074, dated 1936.

500 text 7074 whc 1936 nov p 80 gay blouse 7082 7078 7074

The Commercial Pattern Archive has Butterick pattern 7074, so you can see other views by clicking here.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7082, from Nov. 1936.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7082, from Nov. 1936.

500 text 7082 whc 1936 nov p 80 gay blouse 7082 7078 7074

“Smart women are wearing them with short sleeves to afternoon parties and even to dinner dances with their long-skirted suits. However, long sleeves are also included in the patterns.”

Companion-Butterick pattern 7078 from 1936.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7078 from 1936. I’m assuming that the large clip/brooch at the neck is optional jewelry.

500 text 7078 whc 1936 nov p 80 gay blouse 7082 7078 7074

Katharine Hepburn wore an outfit  with open sleeves (rather like pattern 7078) in the movie Christopher Strong, in 1933. It was issued as Butterick Pattern 5156.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7076 from November 1936, WHC.

Companion-Butterick pattern 7076 from November 1936, WHC. The squares at the neckline are probably not decorative buttons, but a pair of dress clips, a jewelry style popular in the nineteen thirties and forties.

500 7076 text whc 1936 nov p 80 gay blouse 7076

“There may be an extra skirt already hanging in your closet. If not, plain black, brown, or wine-colored velveteen would complete a rich-looking costume, deceptively rich-looking when you consider the small quantity of fabric and the simplicity.” — Woman’s H0me Companion, November 1936, p. 80.

Alternate views of patterns 7072. 7074, 7076, and 7082. 1936.

Alternate views of patterns  7078, 7082, 7074, and 7076.  WHC, Nov. 1936.

Elsa Schiaparelli had begun experimenting with textured fabrics in 1933, like this “boldly crinkled rayon crepe fabric called ‘treebark.’ ” (From Shocking: The Art and Fashion of Elsa Schiaparelli, by Dilys Blum.)

Elsa Schiaparelli began using matelasse and other textured crepe fabrics in the early 1930s.

Elsa Schiaparelli began using matelasse and other textured crepe fabrics in the early 1930s.

An evening blouse made of a textured fabric — especially if it had metallic threads — would be quite chic.

The models’ close-to-the-head hairstyles are also interesting. Two of them appear to have long hair that has been rolled up at sides and back.

Rolled hair styles, Woman's Home Companion, Nov. 1936.

Rolled hair styles, Woman’s Home Companion, Nov. 1936.

Their flat crowns would be compatible with the brimless hats of 1936.

 

 

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5 Comments

Filed under 1930s, Companion-Butterick Patterns, Hairstyles, Uncategorized, Vintage patterns

5 responses to “Blouses for Evening, November 1936

  1. thank you for sharing! love your blog!

  2. Schiaparelli is almost always too over the top for me, but not her textured clothes. I love everything about that brown outfit above. And what inventive patterns!

    • A very similar crinkled polyester showed up in a discount store I loved several years ago. I’m kicking myself for not making at least a simple kimono-style jacket — with fabric that great, all you need is a tunic pattern….

  3. This post is so interesting as always. Was the “one yard” more from saving money or pure practicality – or both? Blouses for evening wear…wow are they stunning!!!

    This post also very much reminds of a 1934 pattern I have in my stash. It is a Du Barry #101B (NRA stamped). The blouse calls for just over a yard of material, and the long bias paneled skirt is recommended to be made out of velveteen, too, like you showed above. It’s funny how you mentioned about metallic – possibly textured fabric…a few years back I came across only one yard of an unusual but lovely textured golden silk. I swapped it up and have it slated to be made from this 30’s one-yard-evening blouse just like the ones in your post! It’s just so hard to find occasions nowadays fancy enough for something like this, otherwise I’d sew it together…maybe if I make it, I’ll then have an occasion for it, right?!

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