Fringe Fashions, December 1918

Old copies of Delineator magazine always have surprises that catch my eye.

December fashions, Delineator, 1918, top of p. 64

December fashions, Delineator magazine, 1918, top of p. 64. Butterick patterns 1276, 1260, 1255, and 1243.

Parts of the December 1918 issue were probably ready to print before the Armistice was announced on November 11, and the magazine contains many references to World War I.

Butterick doll clothing for a soldier, 402, and a sailor, 403. Delineator, December 1918.

Butterick doll clothing: “boy doll’s military suit,” pattern 402, and “boy doll’s sailor suit,” 403. Delineator, December 1918. This woman’s “one-piece dress” pattern was available up to size 44.

text-patterns-1276-402-403-1918-dec-p-65-dec-1918-btm-text

But the “theme” of the month seems to be fringe. Here is the bottom of the same page:

Butterick patterns for women, December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Butterick patterns for women, 1283, 1294, and 1305. December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Fringe could be light-weight, like chenille, or made from heavier silk or cotton. I have encountered monkey fur coats in costume storage. [Eeeeeek. Just as unpleasant as having the paw fall off a vintage fox fur stole.]

More fashions with fringe appeared on page 63:

The blue dress is fringed; the other is trimmed with fur. Delineator, Dec. 1918,. p 63

The blue dress (1278) is trimmed with fringe; the other outfit (blouse 1259 and skirt 1105) is trimmed with fur and decorative buttons. Delineator, Dec. 1918, p 63. Two different muff patterns were illustrated, 1190 and 9517.

In addition to keeping your hands warm, a muff often had an interior pocket that functioned as a purse.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63. Butterick 1253 and waist/blouse 1263 with skirt 9865. No. 1253 is illustrated in satin; waist 1263 is in velvet, worn over a satin skirt.

More fringe from December 1918:

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65.

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65. Fringe trims the center two.

Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.

Fur or fringe trims these Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.  Women’s dresses No. 1294, 1309, and 1285.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. The shape of the skirt is determined by the high-waisted, curve-flattening corset of the era.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. Butterick blouse 1306 with skirt 1226. Shirt-waist pattern 1279 with skirt of suit 1101.

In October, Butterick suggested a fringed wedding gown, pattern 1169, shown again in November in a dark, velvet version:

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal occasion. (November, 1918.)

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal daytime occasion. (November, 1918.)

If you weren’t ready to go wild with fringe, you could carry a subtle fringed handbag instead of a muff.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a matching striped muff; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag. Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a striped muff (Butterick 1266) to match her coat; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag (Butterick pattern 10720.) Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

The coat on the right is a reminder that the “Barrel skirt” or “tonneau” was [to me, inexplicably] in fashion for a while.

 

10 Comments

Filed under 1900s to 1920s, Accessory Patterns, bags, Hairstyles, handbags, Hats, Hosiery, Purses, Vintage patterns, Wedding Clothes, World War I

10 responses to “Fringe Fashions, December 1918

  1. Duy Khang Nguyen

    Hello, again Im very confused what is this

    You can see on her left hand is holding something
    What do you think

    • That is a muff. I had one when I was a little girl. They came in many sizes and were often made of fur. They are generally shaped like a tube. You could put your hands inside the muff to keep them warm, and often there was a small compartment inside for coins, a mirror, a comb, etc., so the muff sometimes took the place of a handbag or purse. The woman in this photo has a white fur muff dangling from her wrist on a loop. Butterick sold muff patterns: there are two on this page. The woman on the left is warming her hands in her muff.

      • Duy Khang Nguyen

        I mean the hand that she put on her belt is that also call “the muff”

      • Sorry — I was looking at the wrong hand. I thing she is holding a pair of ice skates in her left hand. The top skate is upside down. The tan part is the shoe — you can see that it has a flat heel — and the gray parts are the blades. Her dark clothing is visible through the openings in the blades. The blades in this 1927 illustration are simpler, but the sole of the shoe is the same.

  2. Duy Khang Nguyen

    I don’t think that is the pair of skate
    If you need another photo then i have

    Look at the design number 1 (The red design) now don’t look at the hand that holding muff, look at the other hand you can see she is holding the same thing

    P.S sorry for this low-quality image

    • Well, I’ve offered my best suggestion — and I think the lady in this new image is also holding skates — simply as a way to indicate a sporty winter fashion, just at women in illustrations often held parasols or tennis rackets during the summer months. If the text accompanying the illustration doesn’t mention the prop, then it will remain a mystery to me. I couldn’t read the date January ????) on your image, but if you can, then try searching the Hathi Trust for the pattern description. End of discussion.

  3. Duy Khang Nguyen

    Hello again
    Im confused in this photo these day
    PetitPoulailler Delineator [Butterick] 1915 Magazine
    In this photo what is the thing that the grey lady is holding on her arm that she put on her waist
    is that a coat or a muff
    P.s if you cant see the image clearly, you can download by pressing the download icon and choose the ordinary size

    • It’s a pretty illustration, with gray clouds in the sky and stylized flowers on the ground. It’s probably spring, and they are holding umbrellas: the woman in gray is probably holding a coat or jacket over her arm. But that is only a guess. I think I see folds in the fabric. Once again, I think you are focusing on things that are not really important in the illustration. There is no way for us ever to know what it would look like if she was wearing it, and if that thing on her arm was important to the artist, he/she would have drawn it so that we could see its details. The artist has drawn the important clothes so clearly that a skilled costumer could make them from fabric today.

  4. Duy Khang Nguyen

    sorry i mean from flickr can download the image above by searching PetitPoulailler in search people
    Once u get into the profile press album and choose PP Fashion – Delineator Magazine, scroll down and you will see the image above and u can download it

  5. Pingback: What to Wear on New Year's Eve, 1919 – The Sartorial Sleuth

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