Autumn Color for 1928

“The Elegance of Drapery” was the caption for page 28; from left, Butterick patterns 2205, 2178, 2203, and 2207. Delineator magazine, Sept. 1928.

Patterns for women could be intricately cut or relatively simple at the end of 1928. Luxurious, “dressy” fabrics were suggested, and many of these are rather formal afternoon dresses. The text mentions some wrap-around skirts, too.

At the end of summer, clothing that could carry into winter was illustrated. Delineator, September 1928, top of page 29.

In its September issue, Butterick’s Delineator magazine showed some outfits in full color, and others in black and white illustrations enlivened with rust or peachy-tan tones.

“Velvet takes first place among plain and printed fabrics.” Back views of Butterick 2234, 2235, 2201, 2213, 2219, and 2214. Delineator, September 1928, pg. 32.

Velvet — in prints or solid colors — was the theme for these dresses in Delineator, September, 1928. Butterick patterns 2234, 2235, 2201, 2213, 2219, and 2214.

Closer views, from the top:

Left, Butterick 2205; right, 2178. Sept. 1928. The text describes the wrap-around skirt of 2205 as dark red, rather than rust.

The elegance of drapery, Delineator, Sept. 1928. In the early 1920s, skirts often had a straight, simple back, with all the fullness of flounces and godets limited to the front of the garment. “Here they appear at the back as well as the front.”

The elegance of drapery: Butterick 2203 and 2207. Delineator, Sept. 1928. The blue “bolero” dress is made from printed velvet. (Powdering your nose in public — admitting that you wore make-up — had just become acceptable … within limits.)

In the twenties, a “bolero” did not need to be above the waist.

Butterick 2197. Delineator, Sept, 1928, page 29. “Rust brown wool” was recommended for this “street frock.”

Butterick 2188 has a panel running from the skirt, over the shoulder, and around the neck like a scarf. It was available up to 46 inch bust size.

Text describing Butterick 2188, September, 1928. Delineator, p. 29.

This odd style was not unique. A similar “skirt becomes scarf” effect was seen in Butterick 2213:

Butterick 2213 and 2188. 1928.

In fact, 2188 was featured two months in a row. Here it is from August 1928, using a bordered fabric in three shades:

In August, the suitability of this pattern to larger (or older) women was mentioned. Perhaps the straight “line of youth” is why she looks so narrow….

Also from page 29 of the September 1928 issue, this formal dress and coat ensemble would complete a daytime social wardrobe. Butterick 2176 and coat 2149.

Details of Butterick 2176 and 2149. 1928. The dress has a metallic top and a velvet wrap-around skirt. The cut of the skirt is complex, but the bodice and coat are relatively simple.

More patterns for velvet dresses were shown on page 32:

Butterick patterns 2234, 2235, and 2201 were suitable for velvet, a more autumnal fabric than crepe or chiffon. 2235 has a wrap-around skirt.

Patterns 2235 and 2201 were available in larger than average sizes — 48 and 46, respectively.

Velvet was suggested for Butterick 2213, sheer wool or double sided crepe for  2219. Coat 2214 is very simple. Delineator, Sept. 1928, p. 32.

There is an interesting dichotomy between the soft and droopy “draped frocks,” with tiers or panels dipping below the hem, and the more geometric, Deco-influenced ones, appealing to women with different tastes in fashion.

Soft dresses, with bows, tiers of flounces, or panels that dip below the hem. Delineator, September 1928.

Dresses with straight, geometric lines. Same magazine, September, 1928.

 

 

 

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2 Comments

Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Vintage patterns, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

2 responses to “Autumn Color for 1928

  1. I’ll take the straight geometric lines, or should we call it the “line of youth”?

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