Summer Evening Gowns, 1936

Four Vogue evening patterns, Ladies’ Home Journal, July 1936.

Evening gowns were the topic of two articles in Ladies’ Home Journal, July 1936. One featured four Vogue patterns which women could make at home; the other was more inspirational, showing evening dresses and jackets, photographed in color by Edward Steichen.

Evening Gowns from Vogue Patterns, 1936

“We thought of Saturday-night dances and twilight roof-garden dining when we chose these delicious, simple summer evening dresses. Haven’t they the Vogue look about them — in their clear-cut lines,and their new fashion points?” — text from Ladies’ Home Journal, July 1936.

Vogue 7403, 7369, and 7386. LHJ, July 1936. A corsage doesn’t have to be worn on the shoulder….

“First we must tell you about that luscious blue shade. None other than “bluebonnet blue,” the official fashion color for the Texas Centennial this summer. We suggest one frock in this shade if you can wear it, preferable in marquisette or organdy. ”

The Dreamstress.com has a lovely, illustrated article about marquisette.

Butterick 7386, in bluebonnet blue, is “low-cut” but has a sheer bolero jacket cover-up. LHJ, July 1936.

“The low-cut dress No. 7386 has long-sleeved bolero jacket, giving the costume real versatility.”

Vogue 7403 has a tunic top. LHJ, July 1936.

“No. 7403, with its new tunic and tiny cap sleeves cut in one with the blouse is shown in flowered marquisette. It is ‘Easy-to-Make.’ You might prefer lace.”

Vogue 7369 is double-breasted all the way down, with the width of the front panel increasing. LHJ, July 1936.

“No. 7369 is double-breasted all the way down, and trimmed with saw-tooth edging, of embroidered organdy here. Any sheer crisp cotton would be nice.” Rickrack used so that only half of it showed was a popular trim in the mid-thirties.

Vogue 7403, 7369, and 7386. LHJ, July 1936.

Vogue 7400 was recommended for those who don’t feel comfortable in sheer chiffon or organdy. This evening gown can be made from cotton or linen. LHJ, July 1936.

“At least one girl in every crowd feels foolish in floating chiffon, or even organdy. For her, a tailored frock like No. 7400, in bird’s-eye pique or printed linen. You can see it’s an ‘Easy-to-Make.’ “

I appreciate the idea that not every woman wants to look soft and delicate.

In the same issue, photographer Edward Steichen was assigned a group of apparently store bought dresses (not credited) on models grouped around a piano. The two-page layout shows the fashion for very large scale prints. In 1936, women’s magazines like Delineator and Ladies’ Home Journal were still experimenting with photographs instead of fashion drawings, so this full-color spread was an expensive experiment.

Evening dresses photographed for Ladies’ Home Journal by Edward Steichen. July 1936, page 18. Like Vogue 7385, the one on the left has a matching jacket. The one on the right seems inspired by the early 1800’s — or a nightgown.

Large scale feathers were a popular fabric print, perhaps the influence of Elsa Schiaparelli. The cream colored dress has a sheer top layer. LHJ, July 1936, p. 18.

A large scale floral print dominates this gown in a burgundy/dark green combination that was popular. [I have childhood memories — 1940’s — of many gray- wine-and-dark-green drapery and upholstery fabrics, and a color print that seemed to appear in every motel….] The feature article on evening dresses was called “Midsummer Nocturne,” written by Julia Coburn.

On the facing page were two more large-scale print fabrics and what appears to be red marquisette or silk netting.

Three evening gowns photographed by Edward Steichen for Ladies’ Home Journal, July 1936, page 19. The red and the white dresses are very sheer, probably netting or marquisette.

Left, a large-scale floral print on a black ground is spectacular. With such a dramatic fabric, the gown can be very simple. The red gown has a modest layer of sheer marquisette fabric covering a minimalist under layer.  Large horizontal tucks give interest to the skirt. LHJ. July 1936, p. 19.

The combination of a bold, stylized floral design with a sheer white gown is interesting:

A bold linen jacket covers a delicate net dress. LHJ, July 1936, p. 19.

All the sleeves on these two pages are full and puffy at the shoulders — a hint that wide shoulders are  a  coming fashion.

Here is the text written by Julia Coburn to accompany these photographs.

The “white-coated gentlemen” would be wearing summer dinner-jackets:

An off-white, double-breasted dinner jacket worn with tuxedo trousers. Esquire, July 1934.

An off-white dinner jacket was illustrated using cut-outs of the actual fabrics in Esquire, July 1934.

For more about gentlemen’s summer evening dress, click here.

 

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1 Comment

Filed under 1930s, Vintage patterns

One response to “Summer Evening Gowns, 1936

  1. All 3 in the first photo look like nighties or housedresses!
    Bonnie in provence

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