Tag Archives: 1920s hat patttern 1925 1924

Butterick Cloche Hat Pattern 5549, from 1924

Hat pattern for home stitchers, Butterick 5549 from 1924.

Butterick hat pattern 5549 is a simple four-gored cloche hat with a modest brim. (For a previous post describing a different 1920’sButterick hat pattern, No. 5418, click here.) These hat patterns were a revelation to me: many of us were taught to begin a 1920’s hat with a felt “shape,” which has to be cut and steamed into the style you want. This hat is made from a flat sewing pattern.

Butterick cloche hat pattern 5549 from Delineator, October 1924, p. 36. (Duvetyn was a brushed wool.)

Although illustrated on Misses on page 36, it was also featured in illustrations of Ladies’ fashions.

Butterick cloche hat pattern 5549 in 1924 and 1925.

The pattern shows variations in trims (none, feathers, or a ribbon rosette;) sometimes the seams are accented with topstitching, and the brim may or may not be topstitched.

5549 in shiny fabric trimmed with a purchased feather trim.

5549 with a different, drooping feather trim.

5549 with a rosette made of pleated ribbon and a topstitched brim.

5549 worn with a coat and a larger feather cluster.

Hat 5549 with a rosette. (The girl next to her is holding a garden trowel.) Delineator. May 1925.

Here, Butterick hat pattern 5549 is shown next to a “store-bought” hat. Both are chic styles for 1924 – 1925.

Butterick hat 5549 and a purchased hat. Delineator, November 1924.

Note: Vintage patterns sometimes assumed that the stitcher would figure out that things like linings, grosgrain bands and interfacings are needed. At a lecture,  Milliner Wayne Wichern suggested stiffening fabric hats with the natural fiber interfacing used for tailoring men’s suit fronts. It can be steamed into curved shapes using a tailor’s ham. Synthetic interfacings are not recommended. And the grain of the fashion fabric and the interfacing must be matched!  He offers workshops in several locations.

Petersham ribbon (often used for the interior hat band) looks like grosgrain but has a special virtue: grosgrain ribbon does not stretch and cannot be steamed into a curve; Petersham can be made to curve — important when you need to stretch the ribbon on one side, as in the invisible waistband of a skirt, or in millinery.

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Filed under 1920s, Accessory Patterns, Hats, Vintage patterns