Tag Archives: 1936 culotte

Hats from the Ladies’ Home Journal, 1936

Cover of the Ladies' Home Journal, October 1936.

Cover of the Ladies’ Home Journal, October 1936.

The Ladies Home Journal offered advice on chic hats and wardrobe coordination in its October issue, but it also offered a hat pattern — for three cents — for ladies who might want to make their own summer sun hat out of a bandana.

Calico Madcaps, 1936

" Calico Madcaps" from Ladies' Home Journal pattern 1282, August 1936.

” Calico Madcaps” from Ladies’ Home Journal pattern No. 1282, August 1936.

"Calico Madcaps" to make from bandanas; LHJ pattern No. 1282, Aug. 1936.

“Calico Madcaps” to make from bandanas; LHJ pattern No. 1282, Aug. 1936.

"Madcaps" designed by Marian Hagen Scherff, LHJ, Aug. 1936.

“Madcaps” designed by Marian Hagen Scherff, LHJ, Aug. 1936. “The theme for this year’s play clothes is American, so into your sunbonnet and slacks and off to the shore!”

My dermatologist would approve of those wide brims. [A lesson learned the hard way:  don’t forget to put sunscreen on the tops of your ears. Or wear a hat, not just a visor.] The squarish bonnet that shades the sides of the face would cut down on glare (and peripheral vision.) The cloche-like hat with turned-back brim looks more twenties than thirties, but it echoes this hat being worn the same year:

Two off-the face hats, 1936.

Two off-the-face hats, 1936.

The hat on the right is from an ad in Woman’s Home Companion, November, 1936.

Hats with Coats, October 1936

"Watch Your Headline over the Collar of Your Coat." Fashion advice from Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1936.

“Watch Your Headline over the Collar of Your Coat.” Fashion advice from Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1936.

In order to show the hats in detail, I’ve divided these two illustrations into four.

Top Left:

"Red-brown felt hat, brown velvet applied bow . . . .   The new high crown with curling feather." LHJ, Oct. 1936.

“Red-brown felt hat, brown velvet applied bow . . . . The new high crown with curling feather.” LHJ, Oct. 1936.

The red-brown felt is worn with a “red-fox-collared green cape.”The red high-crowned felt hat is worn with a gray Persian lamb coat.

Top Right:

Left, a "Brown brimmed hat with blue ribbon," Right, "Bright quills on a green felt hat with swooping brim." LHJ, Oct. 1936.

Left, a “Brown brimmed hat with blue ribbon,” Right, “Bright quills on a green felt hat with swooping brim.” LHJ, Oct. 1936.

“Upstanding collar on a leopard coat suggests a brown brimmed hat with blue ribbon. . . . Bright green quills on a green felt with swooping brim — above a coat of beaver-like fur.” [At least “beaver-like” fur acknowledges that not many women would be buying leopard in the depths of the Great Depression. But fashion is always about fantasy.] 

Bottom left:

Left, a "black corded felt turban;" center,  a "raspberry velours toque with flying birds;" right, a "black velvet deep toque with  feathers." LHJ, Oct. 1936.

Left, a “black corded-felt deep turban;” center, a “raspberry velours toque with flying birds;” right, a “black velvet deep toque with feathers.” LHJ, Oct. 1936.

“A bright tweed coat with Persian-lamb collar takes a black corded-felt deep turban. . . . Raspberry velours toque with flying birds tops a silver kidskin tuxedo collar coat. . . . Black velvet deep toque with feathers — with black kidskin coat, almost collarless.”

The words “toque” and “turban” seem to be used loosely; the “black corded-felt turban” above does not have the wrapped or draped look of the green ” velvet turban” below.

Bottom right:

Left, "black velvet deep toque with feathers;" center, a "velvet turban with quill and veil;" right, "a rust felt with high crown and  tricorn brim."LHJ, Oct. 1936.

Left, “black velvet deep toque with feathers;” center, a “velvet turban with quill and veil;” right, “a rust felt with high crown and tricorn brim.”LHJ, Oct. 1936.

Center: “Black Persian coat with turnover collar takes a velvet turban with quill and veil. . . . ” Right, “A rust felt with high crown and tricorn brim tops a black Alaska-seal swagger coat.”

You’ve probably noticed that some of these hats give a nod to Elsa Schiaparelli.

I can’t resist showing a couple of hats from an ad for Dodge cars:

Fashion reporter endorsing a Dodge car. Ad, Woman's Home Companion, January 1936.

Fashion reporter endorsing a car. Dodge ad, Woman’s Home Companion, January 1936.

Lilly Dache hat from an advertisement for Dodge cars. WHC, January 1936.

Lilly Dache hat from an advertisement for Dodge cars. WHC, January 1936.

“Big Money,” indeed. As Elsa Lanchester once said of a fellow actress, “She looks like butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth, or anywhere else, either.”

 

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Filed under 1930s, Accessory Patterns, Hats, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Vintage Accessories

Swimsuits and Cruise Clothes, 1936

Ladies' Home Journal, February, 1936

Ladies’ Home Journal, February, 1936

Here are a group of photographs by Fowler-Bagby showing appropriate outfits for a cruise, or for wear in warm climates; the article appeared in the February issue of Ladies’ Home Journal, 1936. In order to show details more clearly, I will break up larger pictures into closer views.

Bathing Suits for 1936

Bathing suits, LHJ, 1936.

Bathing suits, Ladies’ Home Journal, 1936.

From left, a brown maillot under a brown jersey wrap-around skirt; “Up the ladder, skirted swim suit in the new green, with salmon-pink top, bands crossed under the chin. In blue, the famous surplice suit that came from Antibes and does wonders for a good figure. The printed cotton two-piece suit, coral pattern and coral color with white. The blonde lastex crepe suit, with the square peasant scarf worn in immigrant fashion. The heavy terry-knit maillot and swagger coat in pink and red, with a red shiny straw hat in unusual shape.” [A maillot is a one-piece swimsuit.]

The brown outfit is trimmed with “Mexican-colored bands” and includes co-0rdinated purse, belt, and shoes.lhj 1936 feb p 20 striped shoes leftThe blue surplice suit is also shown with colorful sandals:lhj 1936 feb p 20 blue swimsuit shoesI’m afraid the “blonde” lastex suit does not make a very good impression on this particular model, but the coral print two-piece shares the back interest of some evening dresses featured later in the article. The “heavy terry-knit maillot” would probably feel like swimming in a wet bath towel; it’s probably more for lounging than swimming. lhj 1936 feb p 20 swimsuits rightThe 1950s swimsuits that I remember usually did not show separate leg openings like these from 20 years earlier, but had a sort of modesty panel, like the green ‘skirted’ suit on the ladder.

Two Piece Tropical Swim Suit, 1936

This story illustration, by Ritchie Cooper, appeared in the same issue as the swimsuits pictured above:

Story illustration by Ritchie Cooper, LHJ, Feb. 1936

Story illustration by Ritchie Cooper, Ladies’ Home Journal, Feb. 1936

The setting is tropical (Hawaii?) and the full, skirt-like shorts resemble the coral and white print bathing suit above.

Cruise Wardrobe, 1936

This article in the Ladies’ Home Journal reminds women that they will probably be going ashore, so they will need appropriate clothes for the ports they visit, as well as evening dress for dining on board:

“Don’t misjudge your destination. Havana . . . is a metropolitan city, where you should be dressed as circumspectly as in Boston. In some places, . . . you might want to stop in at the big hotel for tea. Better wear a more conventional costume [than “your little deck dress”] and be ready! Only if you know your ground can you be casual about your clothes. If you plan to grab bicycles the minute you get off the dock in Bermuda and ride all day, then your culotte skirt would be completely comfortable and appropriate.”

lhj 1936 feb p 21 22  cruise clothes culottesThe dress on the left has a culotte skirt, which looks like a normal skirt when you stand up straight. It is still not considered dressy enough for Havana. The pants on the right are very full knickers (“plus fours”) which are described as “a coming (but not an arrived) fashion. This year, probably only a few leaders will take them up.”

Versatile Jacket Dresses

The jackets make these dresses appropriate for “deck” or more formal situations on shore.

A dress with matching jacket. 1936, Ladies' Home Journal.

A dress with matching jacket. 1936, Ladies’ Home Journal.

Mauve jacket dress with halter top, 1936.

Mauve jacket dress with halter top, 1936.

Red, white and blue jacket with a nautical print. 1936 cruise wear.

Red, white and blue belted jacket with a nautical print. 1936 cruise wear.

 

"An 'American peasant" outfit for ship or shore; blue denim suit, cotton bandanna blouse, farmer's hat, and a red bag. 1936.

“An ‘American peasant” outfit for ship or shore; blue denim suit, cotton bandanna blouse, farmer’s hat, and a red bag. 1936.

Evening Gowns and  a Dinner Suit

Chartreuse chiffon evening gown, pleated skirt. "The transparent wrap, copied from Heim, is of printed organzine." 1936

Chartreuse chiffon evening gown, pleated skirt. “The transparent wrap, copied from Heim, is of printed organzine.” 1936

lhj 1936 feb p 21 22 evening cruise clothes btm rtlhj 1936 feb p 21 22 evening cruise clothes btm left

Bon Voyage!

 

 

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Filed under 1930s, Bathing Suits, Hats, Shoes, Sportswear, Swimsuits, Women in Trousers