Tag Archives: Butterick 2417 dress 1920

A Dead End in Fashion, 1920

Butterick dress patterns for June, 1920. Delineator magazine.

In fashion, trial balloons are sent up all the time. Some take off into the stratosphere, and some quietly deflate and are forgotten. As far as I can tell, it’s all about timing.
This dress pattern from 1920 got it half right:

Butterick dress pattern 2417, Delineator, June 1920.

Bodice of Butterick 2417 from 1920. Another “Chinese” influenced top from 1920 can be seen here.

The sleeveless look, the sheer embroidered Georgette, and the horizontal line at the hip became standard for evening wear a few years later.

Sleeveless, embroidered evening dress; Butterick 1090, December 1926.

The loose, unfitted, hip-length top turned out to be the look of the future.

Butterick blouse pattern 5172, April 1924. Delineator.

The bottom part of dress 2417, however, was another story,

The skirt of dress 2417 from 1920 didn’t become mainstream fashion. [I heave a sigh of relief….]

“The drawn-in effect achieved by the plaits at the lower part is new…. ” I think those may be tassels on the front pleats. The other pleats (tucks, really) are stitched down. “Lower edge when falling free [is] 1  3/4 yard.”  With 6 or eight stitched-down pleats on each side, it would be considerably less.

Alternate view of Butterick 2417.

Hobble skirts which made wearers take tiny steps were a hit in earlier in the century — this image is from 1911 — but our 1920 version didn’t suit the increasing freedom of women, who were used to plenty of leg-room by 1916.

https://witness2fashion.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/chanel-1916-bell-plate-39-from-fashion-through-fashion-plates-doris-langley-moore.jpg?w=500

Designs by Gabrielle Chanel, dated 1916 [from Doris Langley Moore’s Fashion through Fashion Plates via Quentin Bell.] No need to take mincing little steps in these skirts!

The mid-Twenties’ shape was narrow and unfitted…

These dresses from July 1925 have shapeless, hip-length tops like No. 2417, but are at least as wide at the hem as at the hip, with room for walking.

Butterick dresses for young women; Delineator, September 1925.

… but Mid-Twenties’ skirts didn’t start out wide and then get tighter near the hem, like No. 2417.

Butterick dress pattern 2417, Delineator, June 1920.

Just another fashion dead end!

Advertisement for satin, April 1920. A large end, and a dead end, too.

 

 

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