Tag Archives: Butterick patterns

Hats and Dresses for Young Women, April 1924

The young woman at left wears Butterick dress pattern 5141 with Butterick hat pattern 4973. (The cape can be removed; it buttons on.) The frilly cloche worn with Butterick dress 5167 is presumably store-bought. Delineator, April 1924, page 36.

One of the pleasures of pattern illustrations in old magazines is seeing the accessories that accompany them. I especially enjoyed these 1924 hats and dresses for “Misses age 15 to 20” (and for “smaller women.”) Some of the hats are actually illustrations of  Butterick patterns. Other hats and accessories seem to be drawn (in both senses) from a selection kept on hand at the Butterick offices.

A satin dress topped with a wide brimmed hat. Butterick dress 5173, Delineator, April 1924. Page 36.

I’ll show most of  these outfits in full at the end of this post; first, I’ll show the hat details.

This Butterick dress with cape is pattern 5099. April, 1924. The cascade of roses on the hat would be easy to duplicate.

This wide-brimmed hat has a free-form pattern on the band. It’s worn with a tunic and slip combination, Butterick 5155. April 1924, Delineator.

Right, a simple cloche with an oddly cut front brim is shown with a plaid dress and decorated gloves. Delineator, April 1924, p. 36.

At the top of page 37, a gored cloche hat pattern (Butterick 4973) is shown with a caped dress pattern, Butterick 5070. Delineator, April 1924. I love the rose inside the brim of the hat worn with dress 5136.

As on dress 5141, at the top of this post, the short matching cape on pattern 5070 is optional.

Butterick dress 5145 is decorated with a large monogram (from a Butterick embroidery transfer.) The hat is Butterick pattern 4449. April 1924. Note the wallet-like clutch purse with a handy strap on the back.

Two ways of trimming a cloche hat; shown with Butterick dresses 5114 (left) and 5082. Delineator, April, 1924, p. 37.

Clusters of cherries cascade from the hat worn with Butterick dress 5159. Delineator, April 1924, pg. 37. The dress is made from fabric printed with large roses, shown later in this post.

A pleated frill trims the front of this cloche, like a 20th century version of the fontange. Butterick dress 5165 is probably an afternoon dress. April 1924.

Another Butterick hat pattern, No. 4886, is worn with a coat (Butterick 5120) and matching skirt (Butterick 4983.) Delineator, April 1924.

For those who are curious about the dresses, here are some full-length images:

Butterick 5481 and 5167, Delineator magazine, page 36, April 1924. Even on very young women, the hems are still several inches below the knee. The hips are made snug with tucks and buttons [!]

Page 36, top right: Butterick 5076, 5151, and 5173. Delineator, April 1924.

Top of page 37; Delineator magazine, April 1924.

Bottom of page 37, Delineator, April 1924.

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Filed under 1920s, Accessory Patterns, bags, Gloves, handbags, Hats, Purses, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns

Red and White Print Dresses, Vogue Patterns, 1936

What’s Black and White and Red All Over?

Vogue patterns 7251, 7253, and 7252, from Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936, p. 25.

Vogue patterns 7251, 7253, and 7252, from Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936, p. 25.

Perhaps Valentine’s Day inspired the Ladies’ Home Journal to illustrate these Vogue patterns in black, white and red, back in February, 1936. In the 1930’s, the LHJ didn’t use as much color illustration as the Woman’s Home Companion. When the LHJ stopped selling its own patterns, it began to feature Vogue patterns, just as the WHC had begun selling “Companion-Butterick” patterns in the thirties. (Butterick’s own magazine, Delineator, suddenly ceased to exist in 1937.)
For a while in the twenties, Delineator had abandoned full color illustrations in favor of using black, white, and just one color.

Butterick patterns 1419 and 1417, illustrated in red, black and white by Delineator, May 1927.

Butterick patterns 1419 and 1417, illustrated in red, black and white by Lages, Delineator, May 1927.

(I wonder if Edward Gorey had a stash of 1927 Delineator magazines?) Here are closer views of this illustration:

"French frocks in America." Butterick 1419, Delineator, May 1929. Notice the flashes of red in the pleated skirt.

“French frocks in America.” Butterick 1419, Delineator, May 1929. Notice the flashes of red in the pleated skirt.

Butterick 1417, Delineator, May 1927. If you want to know how those top-stitched pleats were done, click here.

A print scattered with red hearts or leaves. Butterick 1417, Delineator, May 1927. If you want to know how those top-stitched pleats were done, click here.

These Vogue dress illustrations from Ladies’ Home Journal use the same method, but in a less distinctive drawing style. What’s black and white and red all over? These pattern illustrations.

Vogue 7251, illustrated in a foulard print with either a black ground or a red ground. Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue 7251, illustrated in a foulard print with either a dark ground or a red ground. Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936. The alternate view, which appears later in this post, shows a very interesting yoke and shoulder.

Text accompanying Vogue 7251.

Text accompanying Vogue 7251. This dress could be made in dressier versions, using “crinkled satin” or “beige heavy sheer.” a “foulard” design was often used in men’s neckties.

Vogue pattern 7253, for a dress and matching jacket. Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue pattern 7253, for a dress and matching jacket. Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936. The fabric is illustrated with either a pink or dark ground.

Vogue 7253 pattern information. 1936.

Vogue 7253 pattern information. 1936. LHJ suggested that you make the dress  in a floral pattern for a young woman to wear to school, and for a mature woman in sheer navy with tucked sleeves on the jacket.

Alternate views of Vogue 7251, 7253, and 7252. 1935.

Alternate views of Vogue 7251, 7253, and 7252. LHJ, 1936.

Vogue 7252 from Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue 7252 from Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936.

Pattern description for Vogue 7252, 1936.

Pattern description for Vogue 7252, 1936. “The dress itself is slim and simple. The jacket has shaped lapels and a diminutive peplum…. in bright red and navy.”

You can see the dress without its jacket in the alternate view, above. (And the text reveals a shortcoming of black and white illustrations: the fabric is really red and navy blue.)

Butterick suggested print dresses for February 1936, too; left, a solid sheer; and right, a sheer floral print.

Butterick 6630, shown in sheer fabric, and 6634 in a floral print. Delineator, February 1936, p. 37.

Butterick 6630, shown in sheer dark fabric, and 6634 in a sheer floral print. Delineator, February 1936, p. 37.

Butterick print dresses from 1936. Left, pattern 6668, right pattern 6634. The dress in the middle is Butterick 6605. All from Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Butterick print dresses from 1936. Left, pattern 6668; right, pattern 6634. The dress in the middle is Butterick 6605. All from Delineator, Feb. 1936.

We can get an idea of what 1930’s dresses looked like on a real woman from this photo:

Her husband approves of this red and white print outfit, which the young woman made on ther Singer Home Sewing Machine. Singer ad, Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Her husband approves of this red and white print outfit, which the young woman made on her Singer Home Sewing Machine. Butterick 6593. Singer ad, Delineator, Feb. 1936.

This evening dress, in a large-scale butterfly print, is Butterick 6666.

Butterick 6666, a print fabric covered with large butterflies. Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Butterick 6666, a print fabric covered with large butterflies. Delineator, Feb. 1936. It is trimmed with triangular dress clips, which are jewelry, not buttons.

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Elsa Schiaparelli showed a large-scale butterfly on this bathing suit in 1929 …

A Schiaparelli swimsuit and hooded coverup illustrated in Delineator, July 1929.

A Schiaparelli swimsuit and hooded coverup illustrated in Delineator, July 1929. “White wool bathing suit embroidered in black.”

… and made butterflies even more popular in  1937:

Elsa Schiaparelli butterfly dress, in the Metropolitan Museum Costume Collection.

Elsa Schiaparelli butterfly evening dress, 1937. Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum Costume Collection.

I’m all a-flutter! And I seem to have strayed from red and white and black prints.

P.S. In the nineteen fifties, the answer to the children’s riddle “What’s black and white and ‘red’ all over?” was  “A newspaper.”  Gee, I’m feeling old today.

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Fringe Fashions, December 1918

Old copies of Delineator magazine always have surprises that catch my eye.

December fashions, Delineator, 1918, top of p. 64

December fashions, Delineator magazine, 1918, top of p. 64. Butterick patterns 1276, 1260, 1255, and 1243.

Parts of the December 1918 issue were probably ready to print before the Armistice was announced on November 11, and the magazine contains many references to World War I.

Butterick doll clothing for a soldier, 402, and a sailor, 403. Delineator, December 1918.

Butterick doll clothing: “boy doll’s military suit,” pattern 402, and “boy doll’s sailor suit,” 403. Delineator, December 1918. This woman’s “one-piece dress” pattern was available up to size 44.

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But the “theme” of the month seems to be fringe. Here is the bottom of the same page:

Butterick patterns for women, December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Butterick patterns for women, 1283, 1294, and 1305. December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Fringe could be light-weight, like chenille, or made from heavier silk or cotton. I have encountered monkey fur coats in costume storage. [Eeeeeek. Just as unpleasant as having the paw fall off a vintage fox fur stole.]

More fashions with fringe appeared on page 63:

The blue dress is fringed; the other is trimmed with fur. Delineator, Dec. 1918,. p 63

The blue dress (1278) is trimmed with fringe; the other outfit (blouse 1259 and skirt 1105) is trimmed with fur and decorative buttons. Delineator, Dec. 1918, p 63. Two different muff patterns were illustrated, 1190 and 9517.

In addition to keeping your hands warm, a muff often had an interior pocket that functioned as a purse.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63. Butterick 1253 and waist/blouse 1263 with skirt 9865. No. 1253 is illustrated in satin; waist 1263 is in velvet, worn over a satin skirt.

More fringe from December 1918:

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65.

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65. Fringe trims the center two.

Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.

Fur or fringe trims these Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.  Women’s dresses No. 1294, 1309, and 1285.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. The shape of the skirt is determined by the high-waisted, curve-flattening corset of the era.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. Butterick blouse 1306 with skirt 1226. Shirt-waist pattern 1279 with skirt of suit 1101.

In October, Butterick suggested a fringed wedding gown, pattern 1169, shown again in November in a dark, velvet version:

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal occasion. (November, 1918.)

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal daytime occasion. (November, 1918.)

If you weren’t ready to go wild with fringe, you could carry a subtle fringed handbag instead of a muff.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a matching striped muff; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag. Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a striped muff (Butterick 1266) to match her coat; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag (Butterick pattern 10720.) Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

The coat on the right is a reminder that the “Barrel skirt” or “tonneau” was [to me, inexplicably] in fashion for a while.

 

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Formal Frocks for the Holidays, December 1928

Two Formal Frocks from Delineator, December 1928. Butterick patterns 2379 and 2287.

Two “Formal Frocks” from Delineator, December 1928. Butterick patterns 2379 and 2287.

If you love a challenge in sewing chiffon, Butterick 2287 looks like a great opportunity. (I believe those flounces were were curved, which means they’d start stretching the minute you removed them from the pattern paper.) Hems were still short in 1928, but some formal evening gowns were long — in places:

Butterick evening patterns 2347 and 2367, Delineator, December 1928

Butterick evening patterns 2347 and 2367, Delineator, December 1928.

Many late twenties’ hemlines combined long and short looks. (Click here for more examples.) For young women, a fuller skirt was also an option.

Butterick 2366, evening or bridesmaid's gown for young women. Dec. 1928.

Butterick 2366, evening or bridesmaid’s gown for young women. Dec. 1928.

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The shorter, close-to-the-body under layer is visible through the sheer tulle top layer. This dress is also notable for the bareness of its shoulders.

2366 has "lingerie straps;" usually these slip straps were only visible when veiled by a more substantial chiffon or lace dress shoulder, as in Butterick 2287.

Butterick 2366 has “lingerie straps;” usually such thin straps were only visible when veiled by a more substantial chiffon or lace dress shoulder, as in Butterick 2287. December, 1928.

Such thin straps were previously seen on slips and chemises, so using them to hold up a dress was provocative. The girl who wore No. 2366 as shown was presumably not wearing any underwear above the waist, although she could opt for the more conservative, sleeveless version of the dress as shown in the back view. A metallic tulle (see-through) skirt with a metallic tissue lame bodice would have made a less demure gown than the model’s expression suggests. Another lingerie strap evening dress was illustrated in February of 1929.

Butterick 2387 is meant to flutter. Dark fabrics are suggested, which does not rule out red....

Butterick 2387 is meant to flutter. Dark fabrics are suggested, which does not rule out shades of red…. December 1928.

2287-text-1928-dec-p-33-formal-evening-text-2287

The ripple of such flounces is achieved by cutting them on a curve.

Butterick 2379 , with a long “bustle” drape in back, supposedly shows the influence of Chanel.

Butterick formal evening gown pattern 2379; Dec. 1928.

Butterick formal evening gown pattern 2379; Dec. 1928. Note the very low back.

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The long end of the bow “gives the one-piece frock an uneven hem and a down-in-back movement…. The low flare of the tiers [is] in the Chanel manner.” Such bustle bows were seen in 1928 and into the early thirties; The Vintage Traveler recently shared a photo of one originally made in 1932.

Also influenced by Chanel was this “minaret” gown (which looks more like a pagoda to me):

Starched lace stands away from the body in Butterick formal evening dress No. 2347. December 1928.

Starched lace stands away from the body in Butterick formal evening dress No. 2347. December 1928.

2347-text1928-dec-p-33-formal-evening-text-2347

Delineator had illustrated a similar tiered lace dress by Chanel in November:

Lace dress by Chanel, illustrated in Delineator, Nov. 1928, p. 114.

Lace dress by Chanel, “stiffened at the edges,” illustrated in Delineator, Nov. 1928, p. 114.

It’s interesting to think that some (now) droopy, vintage lace gowns might once have been stiffened like these.

Butterick 2367 is asymmetrical, long in places, shown in a metallic brocade fabric, and graced with two enormous, back-to-back fabric flowers at the hip. (Note the very short, close-to-the-head hairstyles in some of these illustrations.)

Butterick evening gown 2367 from December 1928. Delineator.

Butterick evening gown 2367 from December 1928. Delineator.

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This dress seems to be gathered — or more probably ruched, like its flowers — at the side seam under the bow. (Perhaps an underslip supported the weight of this trim?)

The same December issue of Delineator magazine illustrated many beautiful evening shoes to wear with these gowns. Click here for “Dancing Shoes, December 1928.”  And I never get tired of Designer watches from the late twenties. Click here for diamond evening watches, and here for sporty Art Deco Designer watches in color.

Best wishes to everyone who plans to party like it’s 1928! (Oh, wait…. 1929 wasn’t such a good year…. Let’s just set the time machine to 1928.)

Note: I have shown some of these dresses before, but without the details or accompanying descriptions.

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Summer Dresses from Butterick, June 1926

As I read through successive issues of Delineator, I enjoy finding patterns that have common elements. These four color pages from the June, 1926, issue were illustrated by M. S. Walle. Some of the fashion ideas I wrote about in May reappear on new styles in June, like this charming border print:

This 1926 two piece dress uses a border print fabric, although it could also be made in solids or prints. Butterick 6862 for Misses and Small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

This 1926 two piece dress uses a border print fabric, although it could also be made in solids or all-over prints. Butterick 6862 for Misses and Small Women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Delineator was a large format magazine, so I’ll show an overview of each color page and then select pattern illustrations for a closer look.

Clothes for Young Women, Small Women, and Teens, June 1926

Butterick patterns for Misses 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick patterns for Misses 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick pattern 6865 for a simple dress included a handbag pattern. Delineator, June, 1926, p. 27.

Butterick pattern 6865, Delineator, June, 1926, p. 27.

This simple dress pattern included a handbag pattern. The long scarf-like tie passes through buttonholes in the front of the dress — a very common 1920’s feature.

This evening pattern, No. 6819, shows that not every twenties dress had a snug hip band.

This evening pattern, No. 6819, from 1926, shows that not every twenties dress had a snug hip band.

Butterick patterns 6831 and 6842, Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick patterns 6831 and 6842 for misses and teens, Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

The dress on the left has “saddle shoulders” and a long, thin, vertical tie. The yellow dress is made of sheer fabric and has interesting cuffs, with a long ribbon in front to create a vertical line. The dress on the right, below, also has a long ribbon as trim.

The two dresses on the left ar for afternoon parties. (Remember "tea dances?") The dress on the right has decorative smocking. Butterick 6854, 6848, and 6873, Delineator, June 1926.

The two dresses on the left are for afternoon parties. (Remember “tea dances?”) The dress on the right has decorative smocking. Butterick 6854, 6848, and 6873, Delineator, June 1926.

Women’s Dresses, June 1926

Women's dress patterns from Delineator, June 1926, page 28.

Women’s dress patterns from Delineator, June 1926, page 28. “Plaits [Pleats] Narrow Down Smart Width to Parisian Slimness.”

The two dresses at top right look like house dresses, while the four bottom patterns are outdoor dresses, often worn for spectator sports. Notice all the vertical details introduced to draw the eye up and down, instead of across, the body.

Butterick patterns 6858 for a dress and bag, and dress 6867. Delineator, June 1926, p. 28.

Butterick patterns 6858 for a dress and bag, and dress 6867. Delineator, June 1926, p. 28. Triangular pockets!

Spectator sporty dresses, Delineator, June 1926, Page 28. Butterick patterns 6839, 6833, 6794 and 6853.

Spectator sport dresses, Delineator, June 1926, Page 28. Butterick patterns 6839, 6833, 6794 and 6853. “Plaits [pleats] narrow down smart width to Parisian slimness.”

The woman on the left is carrying a shooting stick (a combination walking stick and folding seat.) The white dress appears to have a large, printed scarf billowing behind it.  The dress with a long rectangular bib does not have a belt. The skirt part of dresses like the three at right usually were sewn to an underbodice (like a camisole) that allowed the skirt to hang straight from the shoulders instead of having a waistband.

Dressier dresses for women, Delineator, June 1926, page 29. Butterick pattern illlustrations by M.S. Walle.

Sheer dresses for women, Delineator, June 1926, page 29. Butterick pattern illlustrations by M.S. Walle. The fabric on the bottom four implies that these are afternoon dresses.

Two evening dresses for women, from Butterick patterns 6856 and 6860. Delineator, July 1926, p. 29.

Two evening dresses for women, from Butterick patterns 6856 and 6860. Delineator, July 1926, p. 29.

Orange was a popular color in the twenties; click for a  Chanel evening gown  made of “deep orange” lace.

Afternoon dresses 6871, 6875, and 6863, and a green dress (Butterick 6827) with a long tie threaded through an opening in the bodice. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 29.

Afternoon dresses 6871, 6875, and 6863, and a sheer green dress (Butterick 6827) whose collar ends in long ties threaded through an opening in the bodice. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 29.

Clothes for Children, Summer 1926

Butterick patterns for children, Delineator, June 1926, page 30.

Butterick patterns for children, Delineator, June 1926, page 30.

Dresses for girls 8 to 15 ?? and a little boy's suit. Delineator, June 1926, top left of page 30.

Dresses for girls 8 to 15 ?? and a little boy’s suit. Delineator, June 1926, top left of page 30. Butterick 6841, 6813, 6851, 6880.

Girls dresses from Butterick patterns 6866, 6845. amd 6861. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 30.

Girls’ dresses from Butterick patterns 6866, 6845, and 6861. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 30.

Several of the June dress patterns included a pattern for a handbag — even the ones for girls.

Dress pattern with matching handbags, June 1926. Butterick.

Dress patterns with matching handbags, June 1926. Butterick.

When the same design was manufactured in more than one size group, it was assigned different numbers:

These dresses all use ruching as a design element; the two at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. June 1926.

The two ruched dresses at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. June 1926.

These dresses all use ruching as a design element; the two at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) Note all the different, age-related hem lengths. The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. Ruched dresses were illustrated in May, 1926, and there are other examples in this post.

Chiffon dresses with fluttering panes (aka handkerchief hems) from June (left, No. 6860,) May (No. 6796, center) and June, No. 6819. The pink dress is for MIsses and small women; the yellow one is in women's sizes. 1926.

Chiffon dresses with fluttering panes (aka handkerchief hems) from June (left, No. 6860,) May (No. 6796, center) and June, No. 6819. The pink dress (6819) is for Misses 15 to 20 and small women; the yellow one (6796) is in women’s sizes. 1926.

The gown at the left assumes a rather flat chest, but the two at right have gathering at their shoulders.

You may have noticed that many of these mid-twenties dresses have tucks,  gathering, or ruching near the shoulder, taking the place of bust darts to accommodate a normal female chest. 1926 was also the year when Delineator offered one pattern for a bust flattener next to a pattern for a non-flattening brassiere with two soft “pockets” — both patterns on the same page.

1926: gathering or ruching at the front shoulder takes the place of a bust dart.

1926: Gathering, ruching, smocking or tucks at the front shoulder take the place of a bust dart, creating a little fullness over the chest.

 

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Filed under 1920s, bags, Children's Vintage styles, Sportswear, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Vintage patterns

Church Wedding, September 1933

The wedding dress designed for a movie by Travis Banton as part of Butterick’s Starred Patterns series (August 1933) appeared in The Delineator again the very next month, with no mention of Travis Banton as its designer. This time, it was the centerpiece in a “Church Wedding” feature.

The Church Wedding, Delineator, September 1933, p. 64. From left, patterns 5269, 5299, 5183. Myrtle Lages illustration.

“Church Wedding,” Delineator, September 1933, p. 64. From left, patterns 5269, 5299, 5183. Myrtle Lages illustration.

Helen Twelvetrees in Travis Banton's wedding dress design, from the movie Disgraced. August, 1933.

Helen Twelvetrees in Travis Banton’s wedding dress design, from the movie Disgraced. Delineator, August, 1933.

Detail, Butterick wedding dress pattern 5299, Delineator, Sep. 1933.

Detail, Butterick wedding dress pattern 5299, Delineator, Sep. 1933.

The pin-tucked yoke and the sleeves are the same sheer fabric as the veil; the dress is satin.

Butterick wedding gown 5299, described in Delineator, Sept. 1933 issue.

Butterick wedding gown 5299, described in Delineator, Sept. 1933 issue.

The Maid of Honor, Butterick 5269, as shown in September, 1933. Delineator.

The Maid of Honor, Butterick 5269, as shown in September, 1933. Delineator. “Pansy blue” taffeta with “out-standing shoulders.”

The Maid of Honor’s dress, No. 5269, was illustrated before, in August, and given the name “Wings.” Like many dresses for a wedding party, it was also a normal party dress — and shown on a much younger model.

5269: This "Maid of Honor" dress in September was a Party dress in August. Delineator. 1933.

5269: This “Maid of Honor” dress from September was a party dress for the bride’s trousseau in August. Delineator. 1933.

“From the [bride’s] trousseau comes ‘Wings,’ a charming, creamy white taffeta dress with wings over the shoulders and flaring godets around the bottom that give a quaint, petticoated look. Don’t miss the garnet belt and the circlet of garnets in the hair. Glittering stars and circlets reflect the light on many smooth heads in Paris these days.” — R. S. in Delineator, August 1933.

Bridesmaid dress, Butterick 5183, as shown in September, 1933 Delineator.

Bridesmaid dress, Butterick 5183, as shown in September, 1933 Delineator. “The fichu comes off, leaving a dinner-y dress beneath.” “Have the hats in velvet.”

The Bridesmaid’s dress,  Butterick pattern 5183, also had an independent life:

Butterick 5183 was first illustrated in June, with the name "Late Date."

Butterick 5183 was first illustrated in June, with the name “Late Date.”

Apparently, if you tired of the Letty Lynton ruffles, you could wear the dress without its “fichu.” I wasn’t able to find a picture of it without the fichu, unfortunately, although this illustration from the 1933 catalog shows the fichu/capelet and sleeves made of a different fabric than the dress.

Of course, hats were needed for a church ceremony, but the velvet hats illustrated here look like streetwear in surprisingly dark shades. Perhaps they’re a penny-pinching nod to Depression Era budgets.

Hats for the Bridal party in a Church Wedding, 1933. Very odd.

Hats for the Bridal party in a Church Wedding; Delineator, 1933. Very odd.

 

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Filed under 1930s, Vintage patterns, Vintage patterns from the movies

Smart Dresses for Summer, 1928

This is a full page article from Delineator, June 1928. Seven Butterick patterns are illustrated in full color, as if the seven models were on a rather formal family outing to a park.

"New Smartness," Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

“New Smartness,” Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

The blouson effect, with a wide, tight hip band — called a girdle — was chic in 1928.  If you want to make a dress like this, attaching it to an underbodice will suspend the weight of the skirt from your shoulders, keeping the blouson in place.

Closer views, followed by their pattern descriptions:

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, 2026 and 2071. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Pattern descriptions and alternate views:

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2087, and 2026. June, 1928.

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

The printed chiffon dress is an afternoon dress, worn for dressier occasions than shopping. This pattern could be purchased for bust measurements up to 46 inches. The corresponding hip measurement would be about 49″.

2074 text

The pink dress could have long or short sleeves, and be gathered or pleated.

2078 text

The print dress at far right is surprisingly “an afternoon frock of the more formal type” made in silk crepe, satin or rayon. More formal than chiffon?

2026 text

These two dresses are for girls. The smocked dress on the left could also be made in a long sleeved version. Since smocking requires time-consuming hand sewing, machine shirring was also a possibility.

Closer views of girls' dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

Closer views of girls’ dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

2071 2065 text

Butterick 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

Butterick dresses 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

I suspect that many women made this print dress without the cape in back. Border print fabrics gave 1920’s dresses like this one their impact, although solids and small prints could also be used.

2024 text

No. 2068 was a pattern that could be used for day (with long or short sleeves) or modified for evening wear by making it sleeveless, with a deeper cut neckline and armholes.

2068 text

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for feminine curves. 1928.

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for (modest) feminine curves. 1928.

The lines of tucks on the bodice front (right) remind us that by 1928 breasts were no longer being flattened by young women, although older women might continue to wear a foundation like this “Bien Jolie corsette.”

Ad for a "Bien Jolie" ["Very Pretty"] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926.

Ad for an “exquisite” “Bien Jolie” [“Very Pretty”] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926. A garment like this shapes the body like casing shapes a sausage.

 You can read more about corsets and corsolettes by clicking here. For bust flatteners and bandeaux, click here.

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Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Uncategorized, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes