Tag Archives: cruise clothes 1937 1930s thirties

Boleros Part 3: Day and Evening, 1930s

A bolero jacket tops an evening gown, center, in this editorial illustration by Leslie Saalburg, Delineator, November 1931. The Nineteen Thirties’ bolero was often used with evening wear…. [But boleros continued to be a daytime option, too.] If not actually used as a separate jacket, a bolero might be suggested….

Left, Butterick 4093 from October 1931; right, a vintage dress circa 1929 -31 has the same bolero effect built into its bodice.

Butterick 4093: the width of the bolero enhances the slenderness of the waist and hips. This bolero “runs to a point at the back, is split and tied with a bow.”

A bolero built into the dress contrasts with the slender hips and belted waist. Butterick 3696 from Delineator, February 1931.

This pattern for a tied bolero reminded me of a vintage tied jacket (not a bolero) that I also love.

Right, a bolero for evening is tied at the waist. (Usually, but not always, daytime boleros were tied near their neckline.) Butterick 3460, Delineator, October 1930.

Although this vintage velvet jacket is hip-length, not a bolero, the tie at the waist has the same effect.

Vintage 1930s evening jacket with front-waist tie and dolman sleeves.

The sleeves taper from very full to tight at the lower arm.

This 1931 lamé evening jacket stops at the waist, like a bolero, and has curved fronts, like many boleros — but the word “bolero” is not used:

Another glamorous, but simple, waist-length evening jacket. Butterick 4076 from September 1931. Delineator.

The fad for huge, ruffled “Letty Lynton sleeves” can be seen in this bolero from 1933:

Bolero illustrated for a fashion column, Delineator, April 1933.

In 1936, boleros over evening gowns added versatility to the fashions, which could be worn with or without the jacket, creating two different looks.

A bolero with a long, twisted tie changes this evening gown from daringly bare (left) to chic but modest; the covered-up look was suitable for dinner and night-clubs. Vogue 7507, from Ladies’ Home Journal, November 1936.

[It’s also a reminder that a gown which appears to be black and white in a movie might really be green, or some other intense color.]

A white gown could be “dressed down” for dinner by a colorful bolero jacket. LHJ, July 1936.

This gown in soft silk or chiffon with printed green organza [or some other fairly stiff fabric] has a low back, covered on a cruise ship by a hooded bolero. Convenient for moments when you step out onto the deck in the moonlight. LHJ, February 1936.

Another article on cruise wear also emphasized the bolero jacket — by packing several boleros, you only needed to pack one long evening gown.

Butterick 7407 shows a halter dress in sheer blue printed fabric — topped with a white bolero. Woman’s Home Companion, June 1937.

From a fashion editorial describing a Companion-Butterick cruise wardrobe. WHC, June 1937.

Below right: this sheer bolero over an evening gown appeared in Ladies Home Journal, July 1936:

Vogue 7403, 7369, and 7386. LHJ, July 1936. A corsage doesn’t have to be worn on the shoulder…. Click here for a closer view of the bolero.

Right, a dignified lace dress with matching bolero; Butterick 7998 from 1938. Butterick Fashion News flyer.

That lace gown is probably for mature women, since the size range is 34 to 52 inches (bust.) But evening gowns for teens also showed them with bolero tops.

A bolero tops a prom dress; WHC, May 1937.

A long dance dress for teens, with bolero jacket. Butterick 7354.

This reminds me that wedding dresses for church ceremonies — and prom dresses in conservative schools — could not reveal bare arms (at Roman Catholic weddings) or have strapless tops or “spaghetti straps” as late as the 1960s, so this jacket would satisfy the chaperones. A girl could take it off when she was alone with her date….

Butterick evening gowns, August 1938 pattern flyer.

Butterick 8004, left, and Butterick 7997, right, with removable bolero top. The bodice of 8004 (“molded to slim your waist”) has a sort of false bolero effect, being larger than the gown below it.

Buttterick 8004, 7997, and 8010. BFN, August 1938. No. 8004 was available in sizes for teens and for women up to 44″ bust. The two on the right are for Junior Misses, up to bust 38.”

Another bolero with coordinating evening gown, left, Butterick 8461, from July 1939. BFN.

A Junior Miss evening gown with bolero jacket. From Butterick Fashion News flyer, July 1939. ” ‘Straps’ on the dress tie in a halter effect….”

However, older women might also buy a pattern that included the versatile bolero in 1939.

Right, Vogue 4128, Vogue Fashion Flyer for May 1939.

Designer Lucile Paray was featured in an article about Paris fashion revivals (i.e., “retro-inspired) — like leg-o-mutton or “Directoire” sleeves — in 1937. Paray’s evening suit was inspired by the turn of the century garment (with bolero) illustrated beside it.

Lucile Paray designer evening suit; illustrated for Woman’s Home Companion, December 1937.

The bolero doesn’t get much simpler than this one, from June, 1937:

Butterick 7405, an evening ensemble with bolero jacket, Woman’s Home Companion, June 1937.

Meanwhile, bolero jackets for daytime use were also seen throughout the Thirties.

In fact, Butterick 7405 had many casual and sporty variations for daytime!

Boleros were not just for evening wear in the 1930s. Click here for more about 7405.

To be continued as “Boleros Through the 1930s, Part 4.”

 

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Filed under 1930s, 1930s-1940s, Coats, Coats, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs, Vintage Garments: The Real Thing, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

Pacific Mills

Pacific Mills advertisement, Woman's Home Companion, Nov. 1937. "Maid of Pacific" rayon twill.

Pacific Mills advertisement, Woman’s Home Companion, Nov. 1937. “Maid of Pacific” rayon twill.

I found a whole series of advertisements for clothing made with Pacific Mills fabrics in the Woman’s Home Companion, 1936 and 1937. (I have not examined other years — and only done these years partially.) I’m currently reading Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion, by Elizabeth L. Cline, so finding an American fabric mill that proudly put its own hang-tag on garments made by various manufacturers was another reminder of the days when quality mattered to shoppers.

Pacific Mills "Maid of Pacific" rayon hangtag. WHC, Nov. 1937.

Pacific Mills “Maid of Pacific” rayon hangtag. WHC, Nov. 1937. “Crown Spun Rayon. . . laboratory-tested fabric construction, color fastness, and all wearing qualities.”

Pacific Mills also advertised in The Ladies’ Home Journal in the late 1930s. Full color ads for Pacific Mills fabrics — especially woolens — can be found online dating to the 1940’s and 1950’s as well. (Search for “Pacific Mills Ad”)

The Vintage Traveler recently showed a photo of a woman playing golf while wearing a playsuit under her open dress (click here to see it), and that reminded me of these playsuits shown in Pacific Mills ads:

Playsuits made from Pacific Mills fabrics, June and May, 1937. WHC.

Playsuits made from Pacific Mills fabrics, June and May, 1937. WHC.

Pacific Mills fabrics for cruise wear, April 1937. WHC.

Pacific Mills fabrics for cruise wear, April 1937. WHC.

The Vintage Traveler has described the rise and fall of many American textile mills (Mitchell Company, Lilly Mills, etc.) and I can’t hope to match her scholarship. A year ago, I couldn’t find anything about Pacific Mills online; now, I find that the company began in “1852 in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where it manufactured prints and fancy cottons as well as worsted goods in its woolen mill operations.” [Click here for source.] Pacific Mills acquired more mills near Columbia, South Carolina in the 1900s, and expanded to Lyman, South Carolina, around 1924, where the town grew up around it. Some Pacific mills produced sheeting; I’m not sure which mill produced the printed fabrics in cotton and rayon which are featured in these 1930’s advertisements.

"All Set for Cruising," Ad for Pacific Mills Sportswear Cottons, WHC; April 1937.

“All Set for Cruising,” Ad for Pacific Mills Sportswear Cottons, WHC; April 1937.

Pacific Mills Sportswear Cottons ad, April 1937:    "Jauntaire, a linen-weave cotton; Pamico Crash, a rugged peasant-weave; Ker-Splash, a clever shantung-weave broadcloth; and Piqueway, an attractive printed pique."

Pacific Mills Sportswear Cottons ad, April 1937: “Jauntaire, a linen-weave cotton; Pamico Crash, a rugged peasant-weave; Ker-Splash, a clever shantung-weave broadcloth; and Piqueway, an attractive printed pique.”

In the 1970’s, the mill at Lyman was producing “7,000,000 yards per week of woven fabrics from 36″ to 110″ in width, over a broad range of weight from very light to bottom weights, decorated by roller printing, screen printing, beck dyeing and continuous dyeing. End use was generally apparel and sheeting. . . .” according to the Textile History site. (Click here to read the article.)

Pacific Mills "Crinkle" cottons, Ad in Woman's Home Companion, June 1937. Variations on seersucker, they needed no ironing.

Pacific Mills “Crinkle” cottons, Ad in Woman’s Home Companion, June 1937. Variations on seersucker, they needed no ironing.

Pacific Mills Crinkle cottons:  "Idlease, a medium weight seersucker; for spectator sports, afternoon and evening, Blister Sheer, a very light weight." June, 1937 ad.

Pacific Mills Crinkle cottons: “Idlease, a medium weight seersucker; for spectator sports, afternoon and evening, Blister Sheer, a very light weight.” June, 1937 ad.

“Not illustrated, but just as important, are these other Pacific Crinkles, Kwanta Crepe, Cris Crinkle, and Flock Crinkle. Look at these dresses of smart cottons and you’ll want them. . . . At smart stores everywhere … all identified by the Pacific hang-tag, your assurance not only of style-rightness but of unusual value.” — Ad in Woman’s Home Companion, June 1937.

Pacific Mills Tropical Prints ad, Woman's Home Companion, May 1937.

Pacific Mills Tropical Prints ad, Woman’s Home Companion, May 1937.

1937 may p 48 tropical bike pacific prints ad

Pacific Mills' Tropical Prints ad, May 1937. "Cotton shops in smart stores everywhere are now featuring these Pacific Tropical Prints in a variety of amusing designs."

Pacific Mills’ Tropical Prints ad, May 1937. “Cotton shops in smart stores everywhere are now featuring these Pacific Tropical Prints in a variety of amusing designs.”

“How diverting it will be to wear a playsuit of Sand’ Land pique in a frolicsome sea-horse print . . . a sports frock of Cris Crinkle crepe in a whimsical little airplane design  . . . plus-fours and shirt in Lingolyn, very nautically inclined with an all-over design of anchors and ropes.”

Pacific Mills also made fabrics from rayon and other synthetics.

Pacific Mills ad for synthetic fabric, "Gem-o-Sheer. WHC, May 1937.

Pacific Mills ad for synthetic fabric, “Gem-O-Sheer. WHC, May 1937.

Pacific Mills "Gem-O-Sheer" ad:  ... new sheer synthetic by Pacific. It's cool, washable, serviceable. Designs are smart and colorful, and the texture is soft and dainty." May, 1937.

Pacific Mills “Gem-O-Sheer” ad: “… new sheer synthetic by Pacific. It’s cool, washable, serviceable. Designs are smart and colorful, and the texture is soft and dainty.” May, 1937.

Pacific Mills ad, Ladies' Home journal, Oct. 1936.

Pacific Mills ad, Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1936.

Pacific Mills fabrics for lounging pajamas, housecoats, smocks, dresses. Ad, LHJ, Oct. 1936.

Pacific Mills fabrics for lounging pajamas, housecoats, smocks, dresses. Ad, LHJ, Oct. 1936. ” Cris Crinkle, Smoc-Toc, and Notable Crepe hang-tags.

“Here are quaint Tyrolean prints . . . exquisite Chinese porcelain and carved ivory effects . . . Flemish and French Renaissance motifs . . . border designs from Persia and Mexico. Here, too, are pictorial prints of contemporary events:  the launching of the Queen Mary . . . the approaching election . . . the Chinese Fair in London.” For some fashions showing Chinese-influenced fabrics, click here.

“Cris Crinkle  is a permanently crinkled cotton that requires no ironing; Smoc-Toc, a peasant cotton; Notable Crepe, a cotton and rayon mixture. All are fast to washing.”

This dress is made of rayon:

Pacific Mills Crown Rayon fabric ad, WHC, Oct. 1937.

Pacific Mills Crown Rayon fabric ad, WHC, Oct. 1937.

Maid of  Pacific Crown Rayon, Pacific Mills Ad, Oct. 1937.

Maid of Pacific Crown Rayon, Pacific Mills Ad, Oct. 1937.

“This new twill-weave spun rayon does things for you. Soft dull texture, distinctive designs, rich colorings — all combine to bring out the best  in you and make the simplest frock distinguished.” “Look for the Maid of Pacific selvage-marking or hang tags and the Crown Tested insignia . . . your assurance of complete, lasting satisfaction.”

The Pacific Mills woolen fabrics which were produced in Massachusetts in the 19th century continued to be a mainstay.

Pacific Mills wool flannel for the college campus -- ad from Woman's Home Companion, Sept. 1936.

Pacific Mills wool flannel for the college campus — ad from Woman’s Home Companion, Sept. 1936.

Ad for Pacific Mills wool flannel, WHC, Dec. 1936.

Ad for Pacific Mills wool flannel, WHC, Dec. 1936.

Pacific Flannels hang-tag in ad from WHC, Dec. 1936.

Pacific Flannel “100% wool” hang-tag in ad from WHC, Dec. 1936.

Pacific Mills continued to produce (and advertise) wool fabrics for men’s and women’s suits in the nineteen fifties and sixties. (Click here for a typical ad.) A search for “pacific mills ad” images brings up many lovely, full-color examples.

It’s a little surprising that there was no “product-tie-in” in these ads, naming the companies that used Pacific Mills textiles — or sharing the cost of the advertising!

The mill itself, in Lawrence, MA, is now renovated and rents commercial space to many businesses. (Click here.) The gallery has images of mill workers – mostly female — from the turn of the century and the 1920s. (Click here.)

The mill in Lyman, South Carolina, once the heart of the community, where Pacific Mills had built 325 homes, a community center, a twelve room schoolhouse, churches, a public swimming pool, and services for senior citizens, was sold to Burlington in 1954 and again to M. Lowenstein & Sons. (Click here.) It was sold again, and the Lyman mill was demolished in 2012. Click here for an article about its destruction.

I still have no idea why a textile mill in Massachusetts — and South Carolina — was called “Pacific” Mills.

 

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Filed under 1930s, 1930s-1940s, Nightclothes and Robes, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Sportswear