Tag Archives: Delineator magazine

Red and White Print Dresses, Vogue Patterns, 1936

What’s Black and White and Red All Over?

Vogue patterns 7251, 7253, and 7252, from Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936, p. 25.

Vogue patterns 7251, 7253, and 7252, from Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936, p. 25.

Perhaps Valentine’s Day inspired the Ladies’ Home Journal to illustrate these Vogue patterns in black, white and red, back in February, 1936. In the 1930’s, the LHJ didn’t use as much color illustration as the Woman’s Home Companion. When the LHJ stopped selling its own patterns, it began to feature Vogue patterns, just as the WHC had begun selling “Companion-Butterick” patterns in the thirties. (Butterick’s own magazine, Delineator, suddenly ceased to exist in 1937.)
For a while in the twenties, Delineator had abandoned full color illustrations in favor of using black, white, and just one color.

Butterick patterns 1419 and 1417, illustrated in red, black and white by Delineator, May 1927.

Butterick patterns 1419 and 1417, illustrated in red, black and white by Lages, Delineator, May 1927.

(I wonder if Edward Gorey had a stash of 1927 Delineator magazines?) Here are closer views of this illustration:

"French frocks in America." Butterick 1419, Delineator, May 1929. Notice the flashes of red in the pleated skirt.

“French frocks in America.” Butterick 1419, Delineator, May 1929. Notice the flashes of red in the pleated skirt.

Butterick 1417, Delineator, May 1927. If you want to know how those top-stitched pleats were done, click here.

A print scattered with red hearts or leaves. Butterick 1417, Delineator, May 1927. If you want to know how those top-stitched pleats were done, click here.

These Vogue dress illustrations from Ladies’ Home Journal use the same method, but in a less distinctive drawing style. What’s black and white and red all over? These pattern illustrations.

Vogue 7251, illustrated in a foulard print with either a black ground or a red ground. Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue 7251, illustrated in a foulard print with either a dark ground or a red ground. Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936. The alternate view, which appears later in this post, shows a very interesting yoke and shoulder.

Text accompanying Vogue 7251.

Text accompanying Vogue 7251. This dress could be made in dressier versions, using “crinkled satin” or “beige heavy sheer.” a “foulard” design was often used in men’s neckties.

Vogue pattern 7253, for a dress and matching jacket. Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue pattern 7253, for a dress and matching jacket. Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936. The fabric is illustrated with either a pink or dark ground.

Vogue 7253 pattern information. 1936.

Vogue 7253 pattern information. 1936. LHJ suggested that you make the dress  in a floral pattern for a young woman to wear to school, and for a mature woman in sheer navy with tucked sleeves on the jacket.

Alternate views of Vogue 7251, 7253, and 7252. 1935.

Alternate views of Vogue 7251, 7253, and 7252. LHJ, 1936.

Vogue 7252 from Ladies' Home Journal, February 1936.

Vogue 7252 from Ladies’ Home Journal, February 1936.

Pattern description for Vogue 7252, 1936.

Pattern description for Vogue 7252, 1936. “The dress itself is slim and simple. The jacket has shaped lapels and a diminutive peplum…. in bright red and navy.”

You can see the dress without its jacket in the alternate view, above. (And the text reveals a shortcoming of black and white illustrations: the fabric is really red and navy blue.)

Butterick suggested print dresses for February 1936, too; left, a solid sheer; and right, a sheer floral print.

Butterick 6630, shown in sheer fabric, and 6634 in a floral print. Delineator, February 1936, p. 37.

Butterick 6630, shown in sheer dark fabric, and 6634 in a sheer floral print. Delineator, February 1936, p. 37.

Butterick print dresses from 1936. Left, pattern 6668, right pattern 6634. The dress in the middle is Butterick 6605. All from Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Butterick print dresses from 1936. Left, pattern 6668; right, pattern 6634. The dress in the middle is Butterick 6605. All from Delineator, Feb. 1936.

We can get an idea of what 1930’s dresses looked like on a real woman from this photo:

Her husband approves of this red and white print outfit, which the young woman made on ther Singer Home Sewing Machine. Singer ad, Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Her husband approves of this red and white print outfit, which the young woman made on her Singer Home Sewing Machine. Butterick 6593. Singer ad, Delineator, Feb. 1936.

This evening dress, in a large-scale butterfly print, is Butterick 6666.

Butterick 6666, a print fabric covered with large butterflies. Delineator, Feb. 1936.

Butterick 6666, a print fabric covered with large butterflies. Delineator, Feb. 1936. It is trimmed with triangular dress clips, which are jewelry, not buttons.

text-6666-butterfly-print-delin1936-feb-p-37-top

Elsa Schiaparelli showed a large-scale butterfly on this bathing suit in 1929 …

A Schiaparelli swimsuit and hooded coverup illustrated in Delineator, July 1929.

A Schiaparelli swimsuit and hooded coverup illustrated in Delineator, July 1929. “White wool bathing suit embroidered in black.”

… and made butterflies even more popular in  1937:

Elsa Schiaparelli butterfly dress, in the Metropolitan Museum Costume Collection.

Elsa Schiaparelli butterfly evening dress, 1937. Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum Costume Collection.

I’m all a-flutter! And I seem to have strayed from red and white and black prints.

P.S. In the nineteen fifties, the answer to the children’s riddle “What’s black and white and ‘red’ all over?” was  “A newspaper.”  Gee, I’m feeling old today.

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Fringe Fashions, December 1918

Old copies of Delineator magazine always have surprises that catch my eye.

December fashions, Delineator, 1918, top of p. 64

December fashions, Delineator magazine, 1918, top of p. 64. Butterick patterns 1276, 1260, 1255, and 1243.

Parts of the December 1918 issue were probably ready to print before the Armistice was announced on November 11, and the magazine contains many references to World War I.

Butterick doll clothing for a soldier, 402, and a sailor, 403. Delineator, December 1918.

Butterick doll clothing: “boy doll’s military suit,” pattern 402, and “boy doll’s sailor suit,” 403. Delineator, December 1918. This woman’s “one-piece dress” pattern was available up to size 44.

text-patterns-1276-402-403-1918-dec-p-65-dec-1918-btm-text

But the “theme” of the month seems to be fringe. Here is the bottom of the same page:

Butterick patterns for women, December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Butterick patterns for women, 1283, 1294, and 1305. December 1918. Two are fringed, and the gold dress is trimmed with black monkey fur. Delineator, p. 64.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Pattern descriptions for Butterick 1283, 1294 and 1305, December 1918. Delineator.

Fringe could be light-weight, like chenille, or made from heavier silk or cotton. I have encountered monkey fur coats in costume storage. [Eeeeeek. Just as unpleasant as having the paw fall off a vintage fox fur stole.]

More fashions with fringe appeared on page 63:

The blue dress is fringed; the other is trimmed with fur. Delineator, Dec. 1918,. p 63

The blue dress (1278) is trimmed with fringe; the other outfit (blouse 1259 and skirt 1105) is trimmed with fur and decorative buttons. Delineator, Dec. 1918, p 63. Two different muff patterns were illustrated, 1190 and 9517.

In addition to keeping your hands warm, a muff often had an interior pocket that functioned as a purse.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63.

Two more fringed day dresses, Dec. 1918. Delineator, p 63. Butterick 1253 and waist/blouse 1263 with skirt 9865. No. 1253 is illustrated in satin; waist 1263 is in velvet, worn over a satin skirt.

More fringe from December 1918:

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65.

Butterick patterns illustrated in Delineator. Dec. 1918, page 65. Fringe trims the center two.

Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.

Fur or fringe trims these Butterick patterns in Delineator, page 71, December 1918.  Women’s dresses No. 1294, 1309, and 1285.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Butterick patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. The shape of the skirt is determined by the high-waisted, curve-flattening corset of the era.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68.

Fringe hangs from the pockets of a skirt, Delineator, Dec. 1918, p. 68. Butterick blouse 1306 with skirt 1226. Shirt-waist pattern 1279 with skirt of suit 1101.

In October, Butterick suggested a fringed wedding gown, pattern 1169, shown again in November in a dark, velvet version:

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal occasion. (November, 1918.)

Left, wedding gown 1169, Butterick pattern from October 1918; right, the same pattern in velvet, worn for a formal daytime occasion. (November, 1918.)

If you weren’t ready to go wild with fringe, you could carry a subtle fringed handbag instead of a muff.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a matching striped muff; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag. Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

Winter coats from Butterick December 1918. The woman in the center carries a striped muff (Butterick 1266) to match her coat; the woman on the right carries a fringed handbag (Butterick pattern 10720.) Delineator, December 1918, p. 66.

The coat on the right is a reminder that the “Barrel skirt” or “tonneau” was [to me, inexplicably] in fashion for a while.

 

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Filed under 1900s to 1920s, Accessory Patterns, bags, Hairstyles, handbags, Hats, Hosiery, Purses, Vintage patterns, Wedding Clothes, World War I

Butterick Forecast Wardrobe Patterns, 1927 to 1928

I don’t collect patterns or sell them anymore, so I feel a little weird about finding another category of rare Butterick patterns. These are proving difficult to research, simply because they appeared in a few issues of Delineator with no fanfare (as far as I know,) and then no more was seen of them — at least, not by me.

Forecast Wardrobe from Delineator, November 1927, p. 26. The Butterick pattern numbers are, from left, 9-D, 9-C, 9-B and 9-A. These patterns cost more than four-digit Butterick patterns.

Forecast Wardrobe from Delineator, November 1927, p. 26. The Butterick pattern numbers are, from left, 9-D, 9-C, 9-B and 9-A. These patterns cost a dollar each.

These “forecast wardrobe” patterns are peculiar for two reasons:

  • They are outside the usual four-digit numbering sequence.
  • They cost $1.00 each at a time when most Butterick patterns cost from 25 to 50 cents.
Detail from a Butterick pattern price chart, Delineator magazine, January 1928, page 92.

Detail from a Butterick pattern price chart, Delineator magazine, January 1928, page 92. Pattern numbers and prices in cents. A chart of current pattern prices appeared in every issue.

I stumbled upon a two-page spread of “Fashions of the Forecast Wardrobe” in the January 1928 Delineator [Butterick’s magazine for women,] and didn’t see anything special about them except the odd numbering: 10-A, 10-B, etc.

"Daytime Fashions of the Forecast Wardrobe," Delineator, January 1928, p. 30. From left, Butterick patterns 10 B, 10 F, 10 A and 10 C.

“Daytime Fashions of the Forecast Wardrobe,” Delineator, January 1928, p. 30. From left, Butterick patterns 10 B, 10 F, 10 A and 10 C.

It was the price chart — which appeared at the back of every issue in the late 1920’s — that surprised me.

A typical Butterick Price Chart like this allowed Delineator readers to order by mail. January, 1928. It also helped me to date Butterick patterns.

A typical Butterick Price Chart like this allowed Delineator readers to order by mail.  It also helped me to date Butterick patterns. This one appeared in January 1928.  (Three-digit numbers are craft patterns.) The dollar patterns at the bottom are unusual; other prices are given in cents [Cts.]

I started looking through the previous years — 1927 and 1926 –expecting to find a regular series, but have only discovered five sets of “Forecast” patterns so far, starting with the four-pattern group beginning with 8 (8 A, 8 B, 8 C, and 8 D) in October of 1927 — and those patterns did not appear on the October price chart.

Butterick patterns 8-A through 8-D appeared in an article on wardrobe planning, Delineator, October 1927, p. 26. There was no mention in the article of the patterns' prices.

Butterick patterns 8-A through 8-D appeared in an article on wardrobe planning, Delineator, October 1927, p. 26. There was no mention in the article of the patterns’ special prices.

The group numbered 9 (9 A, 9 B, 9 C, 9 D) was illustrated in the November 1927 Delineator, again without appearing on the price chart.

Butterick patterns 9-A through 9-D appeared in November, 1927, with recommended accessories. Delineator, p. 26.

Butterick patterns 9-A through 9-D appeared in November, 1927, with recommended accessories. Delineator, p. 26.

In January 1928, the eight-pattern Number 10 series was luxuriously illustrated (on the S.S. Ile de France) by L. Frerrier, and showed up on the pattern chart with that $1.00 price, finally giving me an idea why these “Forecast” patterns were special. Series Number 9 patterns were on the January price chart, too.

Butterick "Forecast" patterns 10 D, 10 H, 10 E, 10 G. Illustrated by L. Frerrier for Delineator, January 1928, p. 31.

Butterick “Forecast” patterns 10 D, 10 H, 10 E, 10 G. Illustrated by L. Frerrier for Delineator, January 1928, p. 31.

Another eight-pattern Forecast wardrobe (11 A through 11 H) appeared in March, 1928 — again, a two page spread. The final group of eight (12 A through 12 H) appeared in June, but Frerrier’s illustrations were crammed into just one page. I haven’t gone through 1929 Delineators page by page, but there were no more Forecast patterns in 1928. As Kermit T. Frog would put it , “What the Hey?”

Butterick Forecast patterns 11-C, 11-D, 11-B, and 11-A, from March 1928. Delineator, p. 30.

Butterick Forecast patterns 11-C, 11-D, 11-B, and 11-A, from March 1928. Delineator, p. 30.

I don’t see anything special about the designs of Forecast Wardrobe patterns; in fact, some of them look a bit dowdy. And, as for predicting future fashions — well, if anyone could do that with absolute accuracy, that person would be very rich.

As I work through Delineator magazines for 1928, I’ll be keeping an eye out for these designs; did they reappear with normal numbers and normal prices as time went by? In what way were they “forecast?” And what made them cost twice as much as other patterns?

Has anyone found a vintage Butterick pattern with these peculiar numbers? Did they appear in the store pattern catalogs or store flyers? And, are there more than thirty-two of them (four  in October 1927,  four in November 1927, and eight per month in January, March, and June of 1928?)

I’ll be sharing details of the patterns in later posts; after the library retrieves the bound volumes for 1927 and 1928 from off-site storage, I’ll be reading through their masthead pages in case “Forecast” patterns were announced there. For now, I’m just sharing the mystery.

 

 

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Filed under 1920s, bags, handbags, Purses

Colorful Dresses for May 1926

A page of Butterick patterns from Delineator, May 1926. Illustrated by Marie L. Britton.

A page of Butterick patterns from Delineator, May 1926. Illustrated by Marie L. Britton. Page 29.

If you were looking for summer dress ideas in May, 1926, you might have found inspiration in these Butterick patterns from the Delineator. As often happens, the dresses for “Misses 15 to 20 and small women” show the hemlines that older women would adopt a couple of years later. The full-page colored illustrations were done by Marie L. Britton.

A full page of Butterick fashions for young women, Delineator, May 1926.

A full page of Butterick fashions for young or small women, Delineator, May 1926. Page 27.

I’ll be showing the tops and bottoms of four color pages, but here are a few trends to look for:

Border prints, fashionable in 1925, continue to add charm to 1926 dresses. I especially like the yellow one on the left. Both use the border print at the bottom of their sleeves.

Butterick patterns 6788 and 6779 show how much a border print can contribute to the charm of a one-or two piece twenties dress. Delineator, May 1926.

Butterick patterns 6788 and 6779 show how much a border print can contribute to the charm of a one-or two piece twenties’ dress. Delineator, May 1926.

Both of those patterns also have a sleeve that continues into the yoke, called a saddle shoulder.

Ruching (several parallel lines of gathering) guarantees a snug fit at the hips of these dresses:

Butterick patterns 6817, 6777, 6760 and 6779 use ruching to create a snug hip band. Delineator, May 1926.

Butterick patterns 6817, 6777, 6760 and 6779 use ruching to create a snug hip band. Delineator, May 1926. The very short dress is for girls 15 and under.

Sewing tip: if you don’t want the ruching threads to break, sew a flat panel of sheer fabric matching the slip, and cut to hip size, under the ruching.  (In the 1970s or 1980s, dresses used elastic thread for a similar effect.) To control the blousing, the hip band can be attached to the under slip.

Embroidery, popular in the 1910’s and twenties, adds a custom touch to some of these dresses, although the embroidery was optional. Just a touch of embroidery on the sleeve is a surprise on a rather severe pleated dress (center.)

Embroidery trimmed dresses for women and little girls in the twenties. Delineator, May 1926.

Embroidery-trimmed dresses for women and little girls in the twenties. Delineator, May 1926.

The dress in the middle also has a saddle sleeve — plus another mid-twenties feature so common I almost forgot to mention it: long ties or streamers in front, often part of the collar.

The 1920’s fashion ideal was youthful and slender, but the 1920’s feature we all notice — a horizontal line across the hip, which is the widest part of a woman’s body — was the opposite of slenderizing. You can find many strategies for creating a vertical line in the twenties — including those long 1920’s necklaces — but the most common styling trick is long ribbons or ties down the center front.  Often a band which enclosed the back of the neckline became long ties falling down the front of the dress. Even the coat (below left) has them.

Here are the full images of these — and other — outfits for summer, 1926.

Butterick patterns for young or small women: 6771 (plus a tam-o-shanter hat,) 6775, 6744, and 6788. Delineator, May 1926, p. 27.

Top of page 27, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for young or small women: coat 6771 (plus a tam-o-shanter hat,) dresses 6775, 6744, and 6788.

Butterick patterns for young or small women, Nos. 6777, 6801, 6718, 6791. Delineator, May 1926, p. 27.

Bottom of page 27, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for young or small women, Nos. 6777, 6801, 6718, 6791.  The lavender dress may be a border print; no embroidery pattern is cited. The red dress has a saddle shoulder and rows of yellow decorative top-stitching on collar, cuffs, and pockets.

Women's patterns from Butterick, Nos. 6765 (plus a turban, No. 6634,)No. 6823 (open dress and slip,) and dress No. 6781. Delineator, May 1926, p. 28 top.

Top of page 28, Delineator, May 1926.Women’s patterns from Butterick: far left is dress No. 6765 (plus a turban, pattern 6634,) the blue outfit is No. 6823 (open dress and slip,) and green print dress No. 6781 is at far right.

Bottom of page 28, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6796, 6767, and 6817.

Bottom of page 28, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6796 (far left), 6767 (in black), and 6817 (far right).

Top of page 29, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6785, 6763, and 6787.

Top of page 29, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6785 (far left), 6763 (in black), and 6787 (far right). At far left, the collar binding turns into very long streamers.

Bottom of p. 29, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6792, 6779, 6759.

Bottom of p. 29, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns 6792, 6779, 6759. Notice the stocking colors.

Number 6759 (at right) has a half cape in back. So does Number 6765 (page 28 top left,) the red and black dress with a pleated skirt — and a pleated back-cape.

Top of page 30, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for children and young teens.

Top of page 30, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for children and young teens. Top left is a little boy.

Bottom of page 30, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for children and young teens.

Bottom of page 30, Delineator, May 1926. Butterick patterns for children and young teens. (I love the play of stripes on the far right!) The two middle-school aged girls on either side have mid-knee hemlines.

 

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Filed under 1920s, Children's Vintage styles, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns

Smart Dresses for Summer, 1928

This is a full page article from Delineator, June 1928. Seven Butterick patterns are illustrated in full color, as if the seven models were on a rather formal family outing to a park.

"New Smartness," Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

“New Smartness,” Delineator, June 1928, page 32. These are Butterick patterns for women and girls.

The blouson effect, with a wide, tight hip band — called a girdle — was chic in 1928.  If you want to make a dress like this, attaching it to an underbodice will suspend the weight of the skirt from your shoulders, keeping the blouson in place.

Closer views, followed by their pattern descriptions:

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, 2026 and 2071. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Butterick patterns 2071, 2065. 2024, and 2068. June, 1928; Delineator magazine.

Pattern descriptions and alternate views:

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2087, and 2026. June, 1928.

Closer views of Butterick dresses 2074, 2078, and 2026. June, 1928.

The printed chiffon dress is an afternoon dress, worn for dressier occasions than shopping. This pattern could be purchased for bust measurements up to 46 inches. The corresponding hip measurement would be about 49″.

2074 text

The pink dress could have long or short sleeves, and be gathered or pleated.

2078 text

The print dress at far right is surprisingly “an afternoon frock of the more formal type” made in silk crepe, satin or rayon. More formal than chiffon?

2026 text

These two dresses are for girls. The smocked dress on the left could also be made in a long sleeved version. Since smocking requires time-consuming hand sewing, machine shirring was also a possibility.

Closer views of girls' dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

Closer views of girls’ dresses 2071 and 2065. Butterick patterns for June 1928.

2071 2065 text

Butterick 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

Butterick dresses 2024 and 2068. June, 1928.

I suspect that many women made this print dress without the cape in back. Border print fabrics gave 1920’s dresses like this one their impact, although solids and small prints could also be used.

2024 text

No. 2068 was a pattern that could be used for day (with long or short sleeves) or modified for evening wear by making it sleeveless, with a deeper cut neckline and armholes.

2068 text

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for feminine curves. 1928.

Bodice tucks on No. 2068 would allow for (modest) feminine curves. 1928.

The lines of tucks on the bodice front (right) remind us that by 1928 breasts were no longer being flattened by young women, although older women might continue to wear a foundation like this “Bien Jolie corsette.”

Ad for a "Bien Jolie" ["Very Pretty"] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926.

Ad for an “exquisite” “Bien Jolie” [“Very Pretty”] foundation garment. Delineator, February 1926. A garment like this shapes the body like casing shapes a sausage.

 You can read more about corsets and corsolettes by clicking here. For bust flatteners and bandeaux, click here.

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Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Uncategorized, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

Cloche Hats from Paris Illustrated by Dynevor Rhys, April 1928

Dynevor Rhys illustration of two women's hats, Delineator, April, 1928.

Dynevor Rhys illustration of two women’s hats from Paris; Delineator, April, 1928.

I’ve shown this 1931 illustration by Dhynevor Rhys in an earlier post:

Illustration by Dynevor Rhys, Delineator, November 1931.

Rhys did lovely color illustrations, but even in black and white, his views of five Paris hats for April, 1928, capture the stillness and tranquility of his women. The two hats at the top of the page, and one at the bottom, were illustrated as if they were portraits in nineteen twenties’ photo frames.

Dynevor Rhys illustration of two women's hats, Delineator, April, 1928.

Dynevor Rhys illustration of two women’s hats, Delineator, April, 1928. His signature is visible at the far right.

Starting with the top left hat, by Reboux, here are larger images. The text of the accompanying article is at the bottom of this post. The hat descriptions in gray boxes are their original captions.

An asymmetrical straw hat by Reboux, illustrated in Delineator, April 1928. Dynevor Rhys, Illustration.

An asymmetrical straw hat by Reboux, illustrated in Delineator, April 1928. Dynevor Rhys’ illustration.

“This Reboux hat of natural straw has a one-sided brim — a strong characteristic of spring millinery. The brim hides the face completely on the right side while the other side is prolonged  [into a rolled strip] to run around the crown holding in place at the right the very large flat flower of flat red feathers.”

The Metropolitan Museum has many hats from the house of Reboux; here is one trimmed with a cascade of feathers.

Three of these spring hats are trimmed with red.

One sided blue straw hat by Agnes, in Delineator, April 1928. Dynevor Rhys illustration.

One sided mauve blue straw hat by Agnes, in Delineator, April 1928. Dynevor Rhys illustration.

Agnes, too, is making one-sided straw hats for spring. For this one she used a supple, exotic straw which she calls parasisol. The color is mauve blue and the trimming is her new crepe de Chine ribbon in pale rose color. Agnes is using many of these pastel combinations in her new hats.”

The flower/pompom of ribbon loops on the coat lapel was a popular ornament for coats and dresses, including evening gowns.

Butterick’s cloche hat pattern 5218 from 1925 shows ribbons woven together, but Madame Agnes seems to have formed parallel ribbons into a series of loops — definitely an easy trim to copy! Click here for an extraordinary 1920s’ hat by Agnes, at the blog  From the Bygone.

A "close cap" by Reboux, Delineator illustration by Dynevor Rhys, April 1928.

A “close cap” by Reboux, Delineator illustration by Dynevor Rhys, April 1928.

“There are still a great many close caps. Reboux’ spring version is a little bowl of burnt picot straw fitting the head. The satin ribbon that crosses the back and is made into rosettes with one tab sticking up and the other down over the ears, is exactly the transparent amber color of butterscotch.”

Does this mean the hat has a rosette over each ear, like Princess Leia? I wish we could see what that wide satin ribbon does on the other side of the hat.

A grosgrain hat fitted to the head in turban fashion, by Reboux. Delineator, April 1928.

A grosgrain hat fitted to the head in turban fashion, with red poppy trim. By Reboux. Delineator, April 1928. (This image was slightly distorted by the curvature of the bound magazine.)

“A grosgrain cap by Reboux in leaf green is crossed on the head in turban fashion. Poppy red grosgrain ribbon is fashioned into three flat poppies with black centers. The turban crossing is smart, the trimming is very original. These grosgrain caps are fitted to the head in sections.” [Grosgrain does not stretch.]

 "lopsided" starw hat by Lewis, trimmed with beige and green velvet ribbons. Delineator, April 1928. Illustration by Dhynevor Rhys.

A “lopsided” straw hat by Lewis, trimmed with beige and green velvet ribbons. Delineator, April 1928. Illustration by Dhynevor Rhys.

“This lop-sided effect of brim is very general. A third designer, Lewis, uses it here in a hat of ramailee — another supple, exotic straw — in beige trimmed with narrow velvet ribbons — one beige and the other red. Lewis’ favorite millinery colors in his spring collection are red and green.” The Metropolitan Museum has three nineteen twenties’ hats from Maison Lewis. Click here.

I suppose that the trim colors on a neutral straw hat like this one could be substituted with colors to match your dress. Spring colors of “red and green” reminds us that the color combinations we now associate with Christmas or Halloween did not have those connotations in the twenties.

About Dynevor Rhys:  Although many internet sources will sell you copies of his work, I couldn’t find much biographical information. A search at Ancestry.com turned up records for Burton Rice,  who also worked under the name Dynevor Rhys. (Was he proud of Welsh ancestry? I don’t know.) Artist Burton Rice has a WW I poster in a museum collection (1918); records show that he returned from France in 1917, when he was 23 years old, and again in 1924, aged 30. In 1943 his draft registration card showed him living in New York city, and self-employed. Perhaps he used a pseudonym for commercial art and reserved his birth name for his “fine art,” just as writers often use a pseudonym for their popular fiction (mysteries, romances) and their given name for “serious” or scholarly works. He was still alive in 1959, when he traveled to Chicago. He was born in Illinois, and by happy coincidence, tomorrow is his birthday: he came into the world on April 15, 1894. Happy birthday, Dynevor Rhys/Burton Rice,  and thanks for all those beautiful cover illustrations!

The topic of “blue haired old ladies”  comes up in the text of the article that accompanied these illustrations.  The hat by Agnes is described as a blue mauve, like that sometimes used to color white hair.” (See American Age Fashion’s discussion of blue hair — deliberate or hairdressing disaster? —  here .)

500 left half of text 1928 April p 38 hats reboux agnes Lewis dynevor rhys illus

500 rt side text1928 April p 38 hats reboux agnes Lewis dynevor rhys illus

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Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Hats, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs

Paris Designer Gowns Illustrated by J. Desvignes, 1926

Gowns by Chanel and Patou. Delineator magazine, November 1926.

Gowns by Chanel and Patou. Delineator magazine, November 1926.

There’s nothing about these four Paris evening gowns from 1926 that could be called “everyday fashion.” These are couture, with all the detailing we expect at top prices. The designers are Chanel, Patou, and Doeuillet.

Embroidered "Chinoiserie" gown by Doueillet, and a beaded gown by Patou. Delineator, November 1926.

Embroidered “Chinoiserie” gown by Doeuillet, and a beaded gown by Patou. Delineator, November 1926.

The illustrations are signed “J. Desvignes.” They were originally printed at large scale, longer than most horizontal computer screens, so I’ll be breaking the illustrations down to show the details. They were featured in Delineator magazine in November, 1926, and were available in New York from Frances Clyne — just in time for the holiday season.

A Chanel Evening Gown, November 1926

Left, an evening gown by Chanel, illustrated in November 1926 by J. Desvignes. Delineator, Nov. 1926, page 40.

Left, a red chiffon evening gown by Chanel, illustrated in November 1926 by J. Desvignes. Delineator, Nov. 1926, page 40.

1926 nov p 40 designer Chanel text fond of redt

“Chanel uses red chiffon for this delightful dress which promises to be the frock of the season. It is simple in effect but attains interest by means of its drooping blouse, an intricate girdle, outlined by beads and floating draperies. Chanel’s skirts are longer — in spots — but in general short. Chanel is fond of red for evening.”

Details of Chanel's beaded red chiffon evening dress, 1926. Delineator.

Details of Chanel’s beaded red chiffon evening dress, 1926. Delineator.

It mixes fluid chiffon panels with geometric beading in an Art Deco rhythm. Even the narrow straps are beaded.

A Beaded Evening Gown by Patou, 1926

Beaded evening gown by Patou, illulstated by J. Desvignes, Delineator, Nov. 1926, p 40.

Beaded white evening gown by Patou, illustrated by J. Desvignes, Delineator, Nov. 1926, p 40. “All frost and fire.” I have darkened it to show the beading.

1926 nov p 40 designerPatou right U bodice is new Frances clyne text

“This slender frock of white crepe Roma, all frost and fire with its rhinestones and pearls, was designed by Patou. A faint suggestion of the bolero is cleverly introduced at the waistline. The beaded frock remains faithful to the sheath, giving it a fresh look with tiers and scallops. The U outline of the decolletage is new.”

A “bolero” was any over layer that floated free above the dropped waist. This whole description is interesting to me because it mentions the “sheath,” and because this deep, filled-in U-shape on the bodice is described as “new” in 1926. With hindsight, it’s one of the archetypal 1920s’ evening looks.

A tiered, beaded, rhinestone trimmed evening gown by Patou; Delineator, Nov. 1926.

A white, tiered, beaded, rhinestone-trimmed evening gown by Patou; Delineator, Nov. 1926. The deep U shape on the bodice is “new.” What looks like a long necklace is part of the dress.

Later, Paquin did a series of “necklace dresses,” with beading eliminating the need for jewelry.

A Black Satin Doeuillet Evening Dress, Beaded and Embroidered, from 1926

Left, a black satin gown by Doeuillet; right, a black and white beaded Patou. Ilustrated for Delineator by Desvignes, Nov. 1926, p. 41.

Left, a black satin gown by Doeuillet; right, a black and white beaded Patou. Illustrated for Delineator by Desvignes, Nov. 1926, p. 41.

500 doeuillet text1926 nov p 41 designer Doeuillet left text beaded chinese

“The Chinese influence is apparent in this Doeuillet frock of black satin. It is called “Pagoda,” a name suggested by the pointed hemline, flaring tiers and amusing Chinese motifs in red, blue, and silver beads. Much embroidery worked in silk and metal threads mixed with beads is used for evening.”

Black satin gown with red, blue, and silver embroidery by Doeuillet. Delineator, Nov. 1926.

Details of black satin gown with red, blue, and silver embroidery by Doeuillet. Delineator, Nov. 1926.

Doeuillet was an established couture house in Paris, founded in 1900 and successful in the 1910’s as well as the 1920’s.

A Patou Evening Gown in Black and White, 1926

Black and White evening gown by Jean Patou, illustrated by Desvignes for Delineator, Nov. 1926.

Black and White evening gown by Jean Patou, illustrated by Desvignes for Delineator, Nov. 1926.

500 patou black white text 1926 nov p 41 designer Patou rt evening beaded black and white

“Patou’s frock “Half-and-Half” of black and white Elizabeth crepe relieves its stark simplicity by rhinestones and pearl embroidery. A jabot drapery at the front and a floating panel from the left shoulder add distinction to the silhouette and convey a sense of motion. Models on these two pages imported by Frances Clyne.”

The filled-in neckline of this Patou dress is V shaped, rather than U shaped.

Detail of Black and white, pearl and rhinestone Patou evening dress. Delineator, Nov. 1926.

Detail of Black and white, pearl and rhinestone Patou evening dress. Delineator, Nov. 1926. I have darkened the photo to show the beading pattern.

The name of Patou has long been associated with his sportswear, but the two gowns illustrated here show that he knew how to produce luxe in a context of simplicity. These gowns look un-fussy but still very expensive — they possess a tailored version of glamour and sophistication, as sleek as the models’ hair.

Both Chanel and Patou remained well-known names in the twentieth century because of their best-selling fragrances:  “Chanel No. 5” and “Joy,” respectively.

Frances Clyne, like Hattie Carnegie and some high end department stores, worked with French designers to sell exact copies of their clothes in the United States. They cost twice as much as they did in Paris, but there were no import duties to pay, no wait to clear customs, and clients didn’t have to take a ship to Paris and remain there for fittings, a process which, including travel time, took several weeks.

 

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Filed under 1920s, Hairstyles, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs

Hem Length: Girls to Women

Even these children’s pattern illustrations from 1926 are a delight.

A large color illustration of Butterick patterns for children and young teens. Delineator, January 1926, page 30.

A large color illustration of Butterick patterns for children and young teens. Delineator, January 1926, page 30. This was only part of the page.

Delineator was a large format magazine (about 11 inches wide by 14 high), so I often have to show parts of the illustrations; a whole page would not fit easily on most computer screens (and would be slow to load!)

Girls' dresses, Butterick patterns in Delineator, January 1926.

Girls’ dresses, Butterick patterns in Delineator, January 1926.

These two dresses are “for juniors and girls 8 to 15.” Notice the hemlines — just covering the bottom of the kneecap.

Two girls 15 or under. Butterick pattern illustrations from January 1926.

Two girls 15 or under. Butterick pattern illustrations from January 1926. Patterns 6516, far left, and 6478, in blue.

Within a year or 18 months, patterns for grown women show this length.

Butterick patterns for women, No. 1906 and 1928. Delineator, March, 1928, page 35.

Butterick patterns for women, Nos. 1906 and 1928. Delineator, March, 1928, page 35.

These adult patterns were available in two size ranges. Sizes “15 to 18 years” were for teens and small women, bust measures 32 to 35 inches. They were proportioned for women 5’4″ and under. The normal range of women’s sizes was sold by bust measure:  36 to 44 inches in this case. Short women with a 36 to 44 inch bust would have to alter their patterns. Here is Butterick’s advice for making a pattern fit a short woman, from 1926. Notice how important it is to alter the pattern in the torso, not just the hem. This would also apply to lengthening a 1920s’ pattern, so that the hip belt fell in the correct place. Perhaps this is why so many late 1920s’ photos show older women in long-ish dresses — rather than a sign of “the persistence of fashion,” as I often assume, it could be a sign of not knowing how to alter a dress pattern to fit a short, large body.

Lynn at AmericanAgeFashion (where that photo link leads) often explores the problems of fit on an aging body. Click here for her article about store-bought sizing in the twenties. [Edited 4/10/16 to add link to “Stylish Stout in the 1920s” at American Age Fashion.]

 

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Filed under 1920s, Children's Vintage styles, Vintage patterns

Caught in the Twenties

Cover of Delineator magazine, September 1928. Illustration by Helen Dryden.

Cover of Delineator magazine, September 1928. Illustration by Helen Dryden.

Caught isn’t the right word; “enraptured” might be more accurate. I finally have a chance to visit bound volumes from the mid-nineteen twenties and photograph them, and I wish I could post everything I find. By 1928, Delineator magazine is filled with the styles we think of as “the twenties.”

Butterick patterns for January 1928. Delineator, p. 33.

Butterick patterns for January 1928. Delineator, p. 33. Composite from original illustration. I’ll return to these patterns in a later post. Love that coat!

There’s a strong Art Deco influence in the geometry of day dresses, and there’s drama, beading, and a flutter of chiffon in the evening.

A beaded gown from Paquin, Frbruary 1928, and a jewel studded gown from Lanvin, March 1928. Delineator magazine.

A gown from Paquin, February 1928, and a jewel-studded evening gown from Lanvin, March 1928. Delineator magazine.

For a knock-out evening coat by Lanvin, circa 1927, click here.

Perhaps it’s because I’m a sixties’ girl that the proportions of 1928 look “right” to me.  Not that I would ever want to wear a straight-torso-with-hip-belt dress, but the knee-length skirt balances them better than the skirt lengths of 1925 or 1926.

Print fabrics, Butterick patterns; Delineator, August 1928.

Print fabrics, Butterick patterns; Delineator, August 1928.

With my library time machine, I’m currently “visiting” 1926, 1927 and 1928.  I try to bounce around from decade to decade in this blog, but getting out of the late Twenties is going to be hard.

Joyful geometry: Butterick patterns in Delineator, February 1928.

Joyful geometry: Butterick patterns in Delineator, February 1928. I love the way the angle of the trim on the bodice is echoed by the angle of the pleated skirt panel. Interesting that the button is located at the natural waist….

I’ve already written about the fashion shift of the mid-twenties (click here.) Just to review, fashions for young women (15 to 20) were slightly shorter than those for mature women in 1925 and 1926.

Patterns for adult women, Delineator, December 1925.

Patterns for adult women, Delineator, December 1925.

Patterns for girls 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, December 1925.

Patterns for girls 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, December 1925.

Left, teens 15 to 20; right, adult women. composite based on Delineator, December 1925.

Left, teens 15 to 20; right, adult women. Composite based on Delineator ilustrations, December 1925.

Because teens and adults were drawn differently, it’s hard to get an exact comparison, but the hems on the adult women seem to be a couple of inches farther below the knee. When I compare the two dresses in the center, the orange one on the right looks dowdy to my modern eyes. All four figures are drawn with impossibly long torsos.

Here are some Butterick fashions from 1926:

Pictured are two little girls, and four girls aged "8 to 15 years." Their dresses are quite short, but look like young adult fashions of a couple years later. Delineator, February 1926.

Pictured are two little girls, and four girls aged “8 to 15 years.” Their dresses are quite short, but look like young adult fashions of a year later. Delineator, February 1926.

The proportions on these knee length skirts look “right” to me, but they are not dresses for young women; they are for girls under 15. I especially like that plum colored outfit on the far left.

Two adult women and two girls 8 to 16 years. Delineator, February 1926.

Two adult women flanked by two girls aged 8 to 16 years. Delineator, February 1926.

These are Butterick patterns from 1927:

Women's fashions with straight silhouettes. Butterick 1329 and 1317, Delineator, March 1927.

Women’s fashions with straight silhouettes. Butterick Nos. 1329 and 1317, Delineator, March 1927. I love the use of graded values of the same color, and those repeated geometric, Art Deco jogs on the dress at left — with matching cuffs. Skirts end just below the kneecap.

These couture designs for evening, 1927, use metallic fabrics and beading, and look quintessentially “Twenties.” It would be hard to mistake the dress on the left for any other era.

Left, a fringed and beaded evening gown by Paquin; right a straight metallic dress with ruffles, by Jeanne Carette. Delineator, January 1927, p. 16.

Left, a salmon pink-and-silver fringed and beaded evening gown by Paquin; right, a straight gold metallic cloth dress with finely pleated ruffles, by Yvonne Carette. Delineator, January 1927, p. 16.

Two evening dresses by Chanel. Left, a metallic brocade; right, a dress completely covered with black beads. Delineator, January 1927.

Two evening dresses by Chanel. Left, “deep orange” lace; right, a dress completely covered with black beads. Delineator, January 1927.

1927 jan p 16 designer Chane ltext black beaded J Desvignes illus

Detail of paillette beading on black Chanel dress; Delineator, January 1927.

Detail of paillette beading on black Chanel dress; Delineator, January 1927.  Apparently the beads change direction, giving a checkerboard effect.

If you love the Twenties, it’s hard not to think, “Now, we’re getting somewhere!”

The Metropolitan Museum has a beaded dress from 1926 attributed to Chanel; click here — and don’t forget to click on “Additional Images” for a a close-up of the beading and spangles.

A few images from 1928:

Two women's dresses from October 1928. Butterick 2243 and 2267.

Two women’s dresses from October 1928. Butterick patterns 2243 and 2267. Note the zigzag formed by the skirt panels at right. It’s hard to see, but the band on the left dress is two colors, or two shades of the same color.

This young lady appeared in an ad for Fleischmann’s yeast, which, she said, restored her health. The fabric of her glittering dress is quite striking:

Fleischmann's Yeast ad, Delineator, May 1928.

Fleischmann’s Yeast ad, Delineator, May 1928.

Butterick patterns for women from teens to bust 44". The coat came in sizes 46 and 48, too. Delineator, November 1928. Hems area already on their way down.

Butterick patterns for misses and women (from teens to bust 44″.) The coat came in sizes 46 and 48, too. Delineator, November 1928. Hems are already on their way down.

For more about 1928 “Hems Going Down,” click here. This cartoon dates from 1929.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 1920s, Children's Vintage styles, Hosiery, Vintage Couture Designs, Vintage patterns, vintage photographs, Vintage Styles in Larger Sizes

The Twenties in Color

Ad for Kellogg's Pep Cereal, Delineator, April

Ad for Kellogg’s Pep Cereal, Delineator, April 1927.

As much as I love watching old black and white movies, I’ve always enjoyed reading vintage magazines because of their colorful advertisements.

From an ad for Mazola corn oil, Delineator, June 1927.

Colorful evening dress from an ad for Mazola corn oil, Delineator, June 1927.

It’s hard not to think of the 1920’s and 1930’s as “black and white,” because they were usually photographed in black and white, but the people who lived then did not see their world that way.

A colorful world in an ad for Durkee's salad dressing. Delineator, JUne 1928.

A colorful world in an ad for Durkee’s salad dressing. Delineator, June 1928.

I first embarked on my exploration of vintage Delineator magazines when I discovered over 400 bound copies in storage at my public library. Since I am really interested in everyday fashions, I would have preferred a stack of old McCall’s Magazines, but so many old fashion magazines have been converted to black and white microfilm that I’m happy to have found any bound periodicals in color.

"How do you like your coffee?" A family eating breakfast, Delineator, May 1927. Advertisement for Borden's condensed milk.

“How do you like your coffee?” A family eating breakfast, Delineator, May 1927. Advertisement for Borden’s condensed milk.

Back in 1980, I found a bound volume of Delineator, January to June of 1925, at a library book sale. It had formerly been in the research library at Columbia Studios. I intended to sell it a few years ago, but when I really examined it I was amazed by the number of full color fashion illustrations, so I kept it. As it turns out, 1925 and 1926 were the last years when Delineator printed so many pages in full color.

This amazing shawl is not a fashion illustration, but a soap advertisement from 1927:

This "Aztec" pattern hand painted shawl was made in the Samuel Russel Studio, New York, and illustrated by Katharine Stinger for an Ivory Soap Flakes ad. Delineator, March 1927.

This “Aztec” pattern painted shawl was made in the Samuel Russel Studio, New York, and illustrated by Katharine Stinger for an Ivory Soap Flakes ad. Delineator, March 1927.

As times got harder, The Delineator cut its cover price, decreased its size from large format to the size of a modern magazine, and eliminated color except for full page advertisements like these. By 1933, even ads were scarce, and the magazine was mostly black and white.

But, if you were alive in the nineteen twenties, this was the world you saw.

Woman golfer in an ad for Bromoquinine laxative. Delineator, April 1928.

Woman golfer in an ad for Bromoquinine laxative. Delineator, April 1928.

Casual clothing in an ad for Camel Cigarettes. Delineator, September 1928.

Casual clothing in an ad for Camel Cigarettes. Delineator, September 1928.

This woman washes her fine fabrics in Ivory Soap Flakes, Ad from Delineator, May 1927.

This woman washes her fine fabrics in Ivory Soap Flakes. Ad from Delineator, May 1927.

Ivory Flakes were also recommended for woolens:

Wash your woolen clothing in Ivory Flakes.... An ad from Delineator, October 1928.

Wash your wool clothing in Ivory Flakes…. An ad from Delineator, October 1928. Notice her stockings, which match her suit.

The text at the left tells the story of Biltmore Industries of North Carolina, preserving the craft of hand weaving; “In order to protect the sensitive woolen fibre, we allow no cleaning substance other than Ivory to touch it.”

From an ad for Puffed Wheat cereal, August 1928.

From an ad for Puffed Wheat cereal, August 1928.

That red and blue outfit would look much more sedate in black and white:

The same puffed wheat ad in grayscale.

The same puffed wheat ad converted to  grayscale. 1928 ad.

Even ads for household appliances can be illuminating:

A cheery interior in an ad for Johnson's Paste Wax. March, 1928.

A cheerful and expensive interior in an ad for Johnson’s Paste Wax. March, 1928.

Lavish interiors in silent movies always look dark and heavy — but they were not really black and white.

This woman may have gotten a little too colorful — but it’s an ad for Valspar paint, with “before” and “after” images:

Kitchen colors in an ad for Valspar paint. October, 1928.

“She thought she had a model kitchen, but ….” Kitchen colors in an ad for Valspar paint. October, 1928.

An up-to-date kitchen, October 1928 ad for Valspar paint. Delineator.

An up-to-date kitchen, October 1928 ad for Valspar paint. Delineator. Note the pink sink.

A white kitchen transformed. Valspar paint ad, October 1928.

A white kitchen “modernized” with color. Valspar paint ad, October 1928.

Although the sink appears white in the second illustration, pink sinks were available. This bold yellow and black dress — from an ad for window shades — would be drained of its power in a 1920’s photograph:

"Restful Rooms" thanks to window shades, in an ad from March, 1928. Delineator.

“Restful Rooms” thanks to window shades, in an ad from March, 1928. Delineator.

A lovely rose colored dress in an ad for Feen-a-Mint laxative. March 1927.

A lovely rose-colored dress in an ad for Feen-a-Mint laxative. March 1927.

"Grandmother is still dancing," thanks to Feen-a-Mint. Detail of ad from Delineator, May 1927.

“Grandmother is still dancing,” thanks to Feen-a-Mint. Detail of ad from Delineator, May 1927. Grandmother is wearing a flattering, not-black (!) gown.

Grandmother's secret: Feen-a-Mint. Ad, May 1927.

Grandmother’s secret: Feen-a-Mint. Ad, May 1927.

Digression: There was a time in the 1980’s when directors of Shakespeare’s comedies thought it amusing to costume them completely in black and white and gray to evoke old movies. These black and white “silent movie”/”Fred and Ginger” productions quickly became so commonplace that they signaled “desperate director.” After sitting through one-too-many of these productions, I was delighted to discover that the first English play to be costumed entirely in black and white was A Game at Chess, by Thomas Middleton. It played at The Globe theatre in London in 1625 — long before black and white movie film was invented. It was quite a novel idea.

 

 

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Filed under 1920s, 1920s-1930s, Menswear, Musings, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Resources for Costumers, Sportswear, Vintage Accessories