Tag Archives: hat trim 1920s

Butterick Fashions for April 1920

Ninety-nine years ago, women might have been dreaming about wearing these dresses:

April fashions from Delineator, [EDIT s/b 1920!] 1914.

Butterick patterns from Delineator, April 1920, page 151.

Here they are in detail, in no particular order:

Butterick 2250, with bolero jacket; illustrated in Delineator, April 1920, page 151.

The word “vestee” is used rather loosely.  Other Butterick patterns from this year, in the collection of CoPA, have a line on the bodice pattern for cutting the “suspender top vestee.” I would guess that this dress has a side seam opening, closed with snaps, or hooks and bars. (A hook and bar at the waist is always a good idea!) The bolero jacket has an interesting back; close-fitting sleeves, trimmed with many buttons, are an option. Butterick 2250, April 1920.

Two-piece outfit: Butterick waist (bodice) 2265 with pleated skirt 2170. Delineator, April 1920, p. 151.

Alternate views of Butterick 2265 and 2170. Longer sleeves and/or a collar were optional.

Butterick 2229 has decorative buttons running along the outside of the sleeves and the skirt. Delineator, April 1920, p. 151.

Butterick 2272 from Delineator, April 1920, p. 151. It has bust darts at the shoulders.

Butterick also sold embroidery patterns.

Butterick 2241 from Delineator, April 1920. This combines a tunic top with the peg-top look of previous years.

The handbag pattern is Butterick 10810. That hat is rather wonderful and would be easy to duplicate.

Butterick 2264 from Delineator, April 1920, p. 15.

Note the tassel — probably one end of the rope belt.

The skirts of No. 2272 and 2229 stick out from the body in a similar way.

Although perfectly authentic, these styles might be better suited to comedy (or comic characters) than to serious plays. We always have to consider audience expectations — and that includes changing ideas of beauty.

Of these six designs from April 1920, I know which I would rather wear!

Butterick 2250, with bolero jacket; illustrated in Delineator, April 1920, page 151.

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Filed under 1900s to 1920s, 1920s, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Vintage Accessories

Tam-O’-Shanters for the 1920s, Part 2

Tam pattern # 5458 for Ladies, Misses, girls and Children, Delineator, Sept. 1925.

Tam pattern # 5458 for Ladies, Misses, girls and Children, Delineator, Sept. 1925.

For those who don’t want to wear a cloche hat with their 1920s outfits, there are many other authentic hat options. One, very popular around 1925, was the Tam-o’-Shanter. It was usually, but not always, worn by younger women, and was usually, but not always, more sporty than a cloche.  All of the following Tam-o’-Shanter patterns were featured in Butterick’s Delineator magazine in 1925, although some had first appeared in 1924.

Butterick Tam-o’-Shanter Pattern 5402

Butterick Tam pattern 5402, illustrated in August, 1924 .Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5402, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

The easy ribbon trim, which forms a sort of tassel, looks like it could be pinned into place or secured with beads or buttons. The band could be turned under, as on the left. Popular fabrics for tam-o-shanters included silk velvet, cotton velvet (velveteen or velours,) wool flannel, wool jersey, taffeta, and duvetyn [a fabric with a short nap.] 1924 aug p 34 tam 5402 patternPurely decorative hat pins — Cartier called them “cliquets” — appear on 1920s tams as well as on cloches, or piercing the turned-up front brim of a larger hat. 1925 april p 29 misses hat cliquetHere is Tam pattern 5402 illustrated on young teens:

Butterick tam pattern #5402 illustrated in April 1925, (L) and August 1924 (R). Delineator.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 illustrated in April 1925, (L) and August 1924 (R). Delineator.

Below is the same tam, #5204, illustrated as worn by an adult; a Butterick embroidery transfer has been used to decorate the both hem of her tunic and the crown of her hat. The tunic is worn over a “costume slip,” i.e., a slip intended to show.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 trimmed with Embroidery transfer #10233. Delineator, Jan., 1925.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 trimmed with Embroidery transfer #10233. Delineator, Jan., 1925.

Butterick Tam-o-Shanter Pattern 5416

Butterick Tam pattern #5416, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5416, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

Again, the tam is illustrated on a youngster, probably for “Girls 8 to 14,” but the pattern was intended for women as well. 1924 aug p 34 tam 5416 text

Tam 5416 on a girl with skates,  Jan 1925 and a sophistcated woman, Dec 1925 . Delineator.

Tam #5416 on a girl with skates, Jan. 1925, and on a sophisticated woman, Dec., 1925 . Delineator.

Butterick Tam-o’-Shanter Pattern #5458

Butterick Tam pattern #5458, illustrated in September, 1924. Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5458, illustrated in September, 1924. Delineator.

 

Tam #5458 trimmed with a feather, Oct. 1924, and a tassel, Feb. 1925. Delineator.

Tam #5458 trimmed with a feather, Oct. 1924, and an orange [!] tassel, Feb. 1925. Delineator.

Tam 5458 trimmed with a button, Dec. 1924, and a very long feather, Jan. 1925. Delineator.

Tam #5458 trimmed with a button, Dec. 1924, and a very long feather, Jan. 1925. Delineator.

 

Tam #5458 worn by a dressed up Miss, age 15 to 20, and by a younger teen, with ice skates.

Tam #5458 worn by a dressed-up Miss, age 15 to 20, and by a younger teen, carrying ice skates. Delineator.

Tam-o’-Shanters were also popular in the 1910s;  to read about Tam-O-Shanters for Women, circa 1917,  click here.

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Filed under 1920s, Accessory Patterns, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Sportswear, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns

A Mid-Twenties Cloche Hat Pattern: Butterick 5218

Butterick Hat and Scarf Pattern, # 5218, May 1924 Delineator

Butterick Hat and Scarf Pattern, # 5218, May 1924 Delineator

The vintage cloche hats I’ve seen have usually been either felt or straw, and store-bought. A milliner needs a hat block to pull a felt shape into a cloche, and stitching bands of straw braid into a hat requires great skill (and a specialized sewing machine, unless you do it by hand.) But that did not prevent women from making their own cloche hats from commercial patterns.

Make a Replica Gored Cloche Hat on a Sewing Machine

Two more views of Butterick Hat and Scarf # 5218, May 1924

Two more views of Butterick Hat and Scarf # 5218, May 1924

Butterick sold several kinds of gored cloche hat patterns in the 1920s. The pattern for this one, # 5218 Hat and Scarf, first appeared in May, 1924, and continued to be shown in illustrations in The Delineator magazine for a year, so it was in style through 1925. This hat is for “Ladies and Misses, ” i.e., adults and teens. (None of the magazine descriptions says whether this hat has four, five, or six gores. It looks like four or five with a center front seam to me.) In the winter, woolen fabrics were recommended for the hat and matching scarf; in summer, silk was suggested. winter and summer

This simple hat could be ornamented in many ways.

You could make it in plaid or solid-colored fabric:5218 side and front

1924 aug p 29 misses hat scarf 5218The hat and scarf could both be embroidered to match:1924 may p 39  just hat scarf 5218 embroidered 5214

You could embroider just the turned-back brim:1924 nov p 36 miss hat 5128 embroidered

You could embroider the crown: two embroidered 5218 hats

You could weave together an easy rectangle of grosgrain ribbons, with diagonally trimmed ends hanging free:5218 view d ribbon trim

The ribbon trim could match the hat color, or contrast with it:three woven ribbon trims

You could use contrasting ribbon trim on the hat and embroider your monogram on the scarf in the same color as the ribbon:1924 june p 28 hat 5218 trousseau dresses cape top rt

Or you could add purchased trim: a flower in summer, a pom-pom of silk-covered cording or feathers, a ribbon cockade, etc.

Sample purchased trims, not shown on #5218

Sample purchased trims, not shown on hat #5218

You should be able to adapt a modern four or six gore hat pattern for your cloche; of course, wool or silk will need interfacing to be stiff enough. Milliner Wayne Wichern uses tailor’s hair cloth as interfacing on his custom hats. If you match the grain of the fabric and interfacing carefully, you can use steam and a press cloth to shape the hat around a tailor’s ham.  Unlike synthetic interfacing materials, real haircloth, like silk and wool, is an animal fiber and responds to shaping with moist heat (Fusible interfacing is not recommended! A cloche needs to stretch.)  For inspiration, visit his website. Wayne Wichern Millinery. He is very creative about creating lovely trims from scraps of felt and straw! And he offers classes at his studio in the San Francisco Bay Area, in case you’d like to take a vacation and come home with a hat.

Hats and trims by Wayne WIchern, Milliner photogrraphed at his lecture at the De Young Museum

Hats and trims by Wayne Wichern, Milliner, photographed at his lecture at the De Young Museum

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Filed under 1920s, Accessory Patterns