Tag Archives: tam

Tam-O’-Shanters for the 1920s, Part 2

Tam pattern # 5458 for Ladies, Misses, girls and Children, Delineator, Sept. 1925.

Tam pattern # 5458 for Ladies, Misses, girls and Children, Delineator, Sept. 1925.

For those who don’t want to wear a cloche hat with their 1920s outfits, there are many other authentic hat options. One, very popular around 1925, was the Tam-o’-Shanter. It was usually, but not always, worn by younger women, and was usually, but not always, more sporty than a cloche.  All of the following Tam-o’-Shanter patterns were featured in Butterick’s Delineator magazine in 1925, although some had first appeared in 1924.

Butterick Tam-o’-Shanter Pattern 5402

Butterick Tam pattern 5402, illustrated in August, 1924 .Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5402, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

The easy ribbon trim, which forms a sort of tassel, looks like it could be pinned into place or secured with beads or buttons. The band could be turned under, as on the left. Popular fabrics for tam-o-shanters included silk velvet, cotton velvet (velveteen or velours,) wool flannel, wool jersey, taffeta, and duvetyn [a fabric with a short nap.] 1924 aug p 34 tam 5402 patternPurely decorative hat pins — Cartier called them “cliquets” — appear on 1920s tams as well as on cloches, or piercing the turned-up front brim of a larger hat. 1925 april p 29 misses hat cliquetHere is Tam pattern 5402 illustrated on young teens:

Butterick tam pattern #5402 illustrated in April 1925, (L) and August 1924 (R). Delineator.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 illustrated in April 1925, (L) and August 1924 (R). Delineator.

Below is the same tam, #5204, illustrated as worn by an adult; a Butterick embroidery transfer has been used to decorate the both hem of her tunic and the crown of her hat. The tunic is worn over a “costume slip,” i.e., a slip intended to show.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 trimmed with Embroidery transfer #10233. Delineator, Jan., 1925.

Butterick tam pattern #5402 trimmed with Embroidery transfer #10233. Delineator, Jan., 1925.

Butterick Tam-o-Shanter Pattern 5416

Butterick Tam pattern #5416, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5416, illustrated in August, 1924. Delineator.

Again, the tam is illustrated on a youngster, probably for “Girls 8 to 14,” but the pattern was intended for women as well. 1924 aug p 34 tam 5416 text

Tam 5416 on a girl with skates,  Jan 1925 and a sophistcated woman, Dec 1925 . Delineator.

Tam #5416 on a girl with skates, Jan. 1925, and on a sophisticated woman, Dec., 1925 . Delineator.

Butterick Tam-o’-Shanter Pattern #5458

Butterick Tam pattern #5458, illustrated in September, 1924. Delineator.

Butterick Tam pattern #5458, illustrated in September, 1924. Delineator.

 

Tam #5458 trimmed with a feather, Oct. 1924, and a tassel, Feb. 1925. Delineator.

Tam #5458 trimmed with a feather, Oct. 1924, and an orange [!] tassel, Feb. 1925. Delineator.

Tam 5458 trimmed with a button, Dec. 1924, and a very long feather, Jan. 1925. Delineator.

Tam #5458 trimmed with a button, Dec. 1924, and a very long feather, Jan. 1925. Delineator.

 

Tam #5458 worn by a dressed up Miss, age 15 to 20, and by a younger teen, with ice skates.

Tam #5458 worn by a dressed-up Miss, age 15 to 20, and by a younger teen, carrying ice skates. Delineator.

Tam-o’-Shanters were also popular in the 1910s;  to read about Tam-O-Shanters for Women, circa 1917,  click here.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under 1920s, Accessory Patterns, Children's Vintage styles, Hats, Sportswear, Vintage Accessories, Vintage patterns

Tam-o’-Shanters for Women, 1917

Tams for Women. Ladies' Home Journal, 1917; Delineator, Sept. 1917.

Tams for Women. Ladies’ Home Journal, 1917; Delineator, Sept. 1917.

Tam o’ shanters have been popular hats for women at several periods, including the turn of the century . . .

Women in tams, as pictured in Punch Magazine, 1896 and 1901.

Women in tams, as pictured in Punch Magazine, 1896 and 1901.

the World War I era . . .

Young woman in a fashionable velvet tam, about 1918.

Young woman in a fashionable velvet tam, about 1918.

the twenties, the thirties, the nineteen sixties, and into the twenty-first century:

Tam "Beret" pattern, Vogue # 7980, 2004.

Tam “Beret” pattern, Vogue # 7980, 2004.

Origins of the Tam o’ Shanter

The Tam-o’-Shanter (or Tam o’ Shanter) was originally a hat worn by Scottish men.

Two Scotsmen, as drawn by Charles Keene in Punch Magazine, 1880.

Two Scotsmen, as drawn by Charles Keene in Punch Magazine, 1880.

With them it entered the military . . .

A private in Crawford’s Highland Regiment, 1740, Illustrated by Pierre Turner. From Michael Barthrop’s British Infantry Uniforms Since 1660.

A private in Crawford’s Highland Regiment, 1740, Illustrated by Pierre Turner. From Michael Barthrop’s British Infantry Uniforms Since 1660.

and became part of the official uniform of some regiments, like the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Tams and Berets

In its simplest form, a tam is just a round or oval piece of cloth gathered into a band around the head.

Some tams are made of two round pieces, or a round piece and a cylinder, stitched together around the circumference; the round hole in the lower piece can be eased into the band with or without gathering. This can produce a crisp look, as in this Vogue pattern illustration from 2004.

Vogue pattern 7980, dated 2004.

Vogue pattern 7980, dated 2004.

Vogue called this a beret in 2004; “tam-o-shanter” had disappeared from the current fashion vocabulary by then. Today, you can find tams – some with a 1920s look – at hats.com, but they are classified as berets, not tam o’ shanters.

A beret.

A beret.

Sometimes the words “tam ” and “beret” are used interchangeably, but a beret usually has a very narrow binding around the head, and a relatively small crown.

Tam, 1917.

Tam, 1917.

The tam o’ shanter usually has a wider band.

Also, the crown of a tam is much bigger than the band, and the tam is rarely symmetrical when worn by women; it tilts or droops to one side or to the back.

Both berets and tams can be worn with the band turned to the inside, where it isn’t seen:

Tam o' shanter, 1925.

Tam o’ shanter, 1925. Delineator.

Tams for Women, 1917

Tams were very popular with women’s fashions during the First World War. This Paris design “for very young women” is by Paquin, as famous in her day as Poiret or Patou:

A chic Paris costume for a 'very young lady" by Mme. Paquin, 1917. Delineator.

A chic Paris costume for ‘very young women” by Mme. Paquin, 1917. Delineator.

Here, a Butterick coat pattern is accessorized with a tam (left):

On the left, a tam worn with a coat by Butterick, Sept. 1917. Delineator.

On the left, a tam worn with a coat pattern by Butterick, Sept. 1917. Delineator.

In 1917, tams could reach rather extreme sizes, something like a chef’s toque (technically, a ‘toque” is any hat without a brim; since tam o’ shanters have no brim,  the line between tams and toques can blur. Most fashion hats described as “toques” are more vertical than horizontal, lacking these huge crowns.)

Women in tams, Sept. 1917. Delineator.

Women in tams (one is like a chef’s toque), Sept. 1917. Delineator.

A tam made of fur and a tam made of velvet; Ladies' Home Journal, Nov. 1917.

A tam made of fur and a tam made of fur or velvet; Ladies’ Home Journal, Nov. 1917.

Tams were also popular because they could be knitted or crocheted:

Delineator crochet patterns, Sept. 1917.

Delineator crochet patterns, Sept. 1917.

Ad for Bear Brand Yarn, Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

Ad for Bear Brand Yarn, Ladies’ Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

This young lady got really carried away and made a matching tam, scarf, and handbag trimmed with Vari-colored cross-stitch:

Ladies' Home Journal, Sept. 1917.

Ladies’ Home Journal, Sept. 1917.

A knit tam could be rolled up and stuck in a pocket, which made them handy for wearing to school.

Both Delineator magazine and Ladies’ Home Journal encouraged their readers to economize during the First World War by making new clothes from worn-out or out-moded clothing.  One Home Journal reader bragged that she salvaged enough fabric from her old velvet skirt to make tams for both of her daughters and a “small toque” for herself:

Ladies' Home Journal, Sept. 1917.

Ladies’ Home Journal, Sept. 1917.

Her examples look very much like this soft tam (or toque?) from Delineator magazine:

Delineator, Sept 1917.

Delineator, Sept 1917.

Perhaps the model on the right is explaining that her clever mother made this soft velvet hat from an old skirt.

 

 

 

 

 

13 Comments

Filed under 1870s to 1900s fashions, 1900s to 1920s, Accessory Patterns, Hats, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs