Tag Archives: twenties coats

Winter Fashions for Women, 1926

Paquin model imported by Hattie Carnegie; Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Paquin model imported by Hattie Carnegie; Delineator, Dec. 1926.

The lavish use of fur in the twenties and thirties may be repellent to us now, but these fashions for December, 1926, are undeniably glamorous. They are all from Delineator magazine. Two images illustrate clothes in the stores — very exclusive stores — and the rest illustrate Butterick patterns (Delineator was a Butterick publication.) The suit pictured above  is a Hattie Carnegie copy of a wine red velvet suit trimmed with beige fox, from the house of Paquin (French designer Jeanne Paquin had retired in 1920.)

Original model by Frances Clyne, in green and gray. Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Original model by Frances Clyne, in green and gray. Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Titled “Green and Gray,” the caption says “The New York version of the Paris ensemble is made by Frances Clyne in sea green bordered with dyed gray fox. The coat of green French wool swings slightly from the shoulder and is made with the new double animal collar. The frock is of green satin opening over lighter green crepe Elizabeth.” Frances Clyne operated an exclusive New York dress shop; in the 1930s, it was on Fifth Avenue.

This Butterick advertisement showed women how similar styles could be made at home, or by your own professional dressmaker.

Ad for Butterick patterns from Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Ad for Butterick patterns from Delineator, Dec. 1926.

“She has Paris taste and knowledge of clothes, and her Frock is Butterick Design 1155 and her Coat is Butterick Design 1105 made with the aid of the Deltor — a dressmaking chart in pictures for cutting, putting together, and finishing.” [punctuation added.]

Butterick was one of the first companies to offer a separate sheet of written instructions with its patterns. At the start of the twentieth century, patterns came with only the minimal instructions that would fit on the outside of the (usually quite small) pattern envelope.  “By 1920, Butterick referred to the [illustrated] instruction sheet as the ‘Deltor,’ short for Delineator.” [Joy Spanbel Emery in A History of the Paper Pattern Industry.]

I love the bold Art Deco fabric on this sporty coat:

Butterick patterns, Dec. 1926; A Chanel suit, January 1925. Both  illustrations are from Delineator.

Butterick coat and dress patterns, Dec. 1926; A Chanel suit, January 1925. Both illustrations are from Delineator.

The dress shown with the coat (left) shows the lasting influence of Gabrielle Chanel’s outfit from January 1925. The proportions of the tops are slightly different to balance the skirt length, which has risen drastically in just two years.

Here are four more styles from Butterick, featured in the same December 1926 issue.

Butterick coat and dress patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Butterick coat and dress patterns, Delineator, Dec. 1926.

Back views and description of Butterick 1174 and 1157, Dec. 1926.

Back views and description of Butterick 1174 and 1157, Dec. 1926.

The deep armholes of the dress at left required a similarly constructed coat:

Back views and description of Butterick patterns 1185 and 1158. Dec. 1926.

Back views and description of Butterick patterns 1185 and 1158. Dec. 1926.

[Fine ‘Plaits’ means fine pleats, not braids.] The backs of many 1920s dresses and coats were straight and plain, but this coat is snugged to the hip with tucks in front and back.

So far, I have not seen any mention in Delineator magazine of how women obtained the furs which were so often an important design element in Butterick coats. (Working with real furs is not the same as sewing with fabrics, and where would a small-town dressmaker find whole skins?)

Also, notice how similar many of these 1926 cloche hats are, with pinched or dented crowns.

Four cloche hats from Dec. 1926 Delineator.

Four cloche hats from Dec. 1926 Delineator.

 

 

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Filed under 1920s, Hats, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Couture Designs, Vintage patterns

Striped Coats for Women, 1924

Striped coats were apparently quite stylish in the spring of 1924. Butterick pattern #5181 suggested a boldly striped fabric for a woman’s coat, illustrated in misses’ sizes, and Ford Motors featured an equally bold striped coat in its March advertisement in The Delineator magazine.

Ad for Ford Tudor Sedan, Delineator, March 1924

Ad for Ford Tudor Sedan, Delineator, March 1924

A 1920s Striped Coat Pattern for Misses and Ladies

Butterick’s Delineator magazine, May 1924, pattern # 5181

Butterick’s Delineator magazine, May 1924, pattern # 5181

“5181 – At this season the débutante is in need of this type of coat with a straight lower part joined to a long body with a choice of inside pocket. It may be a longer length if one prefers a full-length coat. Use striped coatings, soft twills, rep cloth, heavy silk crêpe, satin. Lower edge in longer length 46 inches.

17 years or 34 bust requires 2 5/8 yards 54-inch striped wool. The coat is for misses 16 to 18 years or 33 to 35 bust, also Ladies.”

Striped Coat in a Ford Tudor Sedan Ad, 1924

Ad for Ford Tudor Sedan, Delineator, March 1924

Ad for Ford Tudor Sedan, Delineator, March 1924

Ford was late to enter the closed car market, but when it did, a whole series of advertisements aimed at women appeared in the women’s magazines. These ads always showed a woman driver, taking her children to school, shopping, or, here, giving her friend a ride on a rainy day.1924 march p 53 ford tudor 500 dpi striped coat woman driver striped coat

1924 march p 53 ford tudor text striped coat

“Not even a chilly all-day rain need upset the plans of the woman who has a Ford closed car at her disposal. Knowing it to be reliable and comfortable in all weathers, she goes out whenever inclination suggests or duty dictates

“The car is so easy to drive that it constantly suggests thoughtful services to her friends. She can call for them without effort and share pleasantly their companionship.

“All remark upon the graceful outward appearance of her car, its convenient and attractive interior, and its cosy comfort. And she prides herself upon having obtained so desirable a car for so low a price.”

The Tudor Sedan pictured cost $590; the Fordor Sedan cost $685, and a Coupe, $525.

I love the woman’s embroidered hatband. Incidentally, notice how long hems were at the beginning of 1924. The miss who opted for the  7/8 length shown  (#5181) would be wearing it as a full-length coat in 1925.

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Filed under 1920s, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Vintage patterns