Tag Archives: valentine costume 1924 butterick 4470 child girl costume

Valentine’s Day Costume, 1924

This heart-trimmed costume for a little girl caught my eye.

A little girl in a heart-trimmed costume. Butterick pattern from February 1924. Delineator.

A little girl in a heart-trimmed costume — including her shoes and socks. Butterick pattern  4470 from February 1924. Delineator. A costume for Martha Washington, No. 4258, is at left.

1924 feb p 35 costumes text little girl

Oddly, she is accompanied by “Martha Washington.”

1924 feb p 35 costumes text martha washington
Oddly, there is no “George Washington” costume on this page — just this “Continental costume” (at right.)

Uncle Sam, Miss America/Miss Liberty, and a Continental costume for a man. Butterick patterns 5048, 5047, and 4262. Delineator, February 1924.

Uncle Sam, Miss America/Miss Liberty, and a Continental costume for a man. Butterick patterns 5048, 5047, and 4262. Delineator, February 1924.

The Continental gentleman is accompanied by “Uncle Sam” and either Miss America or Miss Liberty (they “are synonomous.”)

1924 feb p 35 costume5047 text miss america
Apparently, Butterick was trying to supply patterns ahead of time for the 4th of July celebrations and pageants held all over small-town America. Of course, masquerade parties were popular all year round, not just at Halloween.

1924 feb p 35 costume 5048 text uncle sam

1924 feb p 35 costume 4262 Continental costume text

Happy Saint Valentine’s Day — and why is there no costume for him?

“No record exists of romantic celebrations on Valentine’s Day prior to a poem Chaucer wrote around 1375. In his work “Parliament of Foules,” he links a tradition of courtly love with the celebration of St. Valentine’s feast day–an association that didn’t exist until after his poem received widespread attention. The poem refers to February 14 as the day birds (and humans) come together to find a mate. When Chaucer wrote, “For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day / Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate,” he may have invented the holiday we know today.” — from History.com

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Filed under 1920s, Children's Vintage styles, Musings, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture