Tag Archives: Vionnet influence 1920s

Butterick Forecast Patterns, Fall 1927

I promised more details about Butterick  “Forecast” wardrobe patterns. Butterick’s Delineator magazine gave just one page to patterns 8 A through 8 D in October of 1927, and one page to patterns 9 A through 9 D in November. The fact that they cost $1 each — and had very strange pattern numbers — wasn’t mentioned. [But I still need to revisit those volumes….]

Incidentally, there is no consistency about these pattern numbers — the illustration might use a hyphen (9-A), while the text said (9A) and a space might be used in Delineator‘s pattern list (9 A). I wonder what the pattern envelopes said….

Butterick Forecast Wardrobe Patterns, October 1927

Butterick Forecast patterns 8 A through 8D, Delineator, p. 26, October 1927.

Butterick Forecast patterns 8 A through 8 D, Delineator, p. 26, October 1927. “The Smart Woman sees Each Costume as a Part of the Whole Wardrobe.”

Some recommended accessories were illustrated and described along with the patterns.

Butterick pattern 8 A, Delineator, Oct. 1927.

Butterick pattern 8 A, Delineator, Oct. 1927. Her bag seems to match her scarf.

8A 500 text1927 oct p 26

Butterick pattern 8 B, for a complex but lovely evening dress.

Butterick pattern 8 B, for a complex but lovely evening dress. Chartreuse Georgette fabric was suggested.

A large bar pin sits below the V neckline.

text 8B 1927 oct p 26 The purse, shoe, stockings, and optional flowers or necklace were also illustrated.

Two flowers made of organdie could be attached to the shoulder of the evening dress, or a necklace could be worn. 1927.

Two flowers made of organdie could be attached to the shoulder of the evening dress, or a fringe necklace of gold could be worn. 1927.

At first, I thought the necklet was inspired by Egyptian revival lotus buds, but you can see that they are individual long and short beads.

Very sheer stockings for evening wear might still have  pattern (called a “clock”) on their sides.

Sheer stockings for evening wear. Delinator, Oct. 1927.

Sheer stockings for evening wear. Delinator, Oct. 1927.

These nearly identical clocked formal stockings appeared in an ad for Kayser Hosiery three years earlier.

Sheer stockings with "clocks" for formal evening or bridal wear. Ad for Kayser Hosiery, Nov. 1924.

Sheer stockings with “clocks” for formal evening or bridal wear. Ad for Kayser Hosiery, Nov. 1924. Stockings were often matched to the color of the dress in the twenties.

 

Butterick pattern 8 C, October 1927, Delineator.

Butterick pattern 8 C, October 1927, Delineator.

frock 8C text 1927 oct p 26

A bag for daytime use, Oct. 1927 Delineator.

A bag for daytime use, Oct. 1927 Delineator.

top rt shoe glove1927 oct p 26 accessories and wardrobe 8A 8D 8C 8B not listed in chart top RThe bag and “slipper” (shown below) could be suede, lizard, or kid. The color of the gloves should match the color of the “guimpe” [a false blouse or dickey] under the dress. Fox fur “scarves” or neckpieces were widely worn, even with very lightweight, summery fabrics. Below, pattern 8 C is shown under the wrap coat, but made in a lighter color.

Butterick coat pattern 8 D from Delineator, Oct. 1927.

Butterick coat pattern 8 D from Delineator, Oct. 1927.

8D text coat 1927 oct p 26

Butterick Forecast Wardrobe Patterns, November 1927

top text1927 nov p 26 forecast wardrobe 9D 9C 9B 9A and accessories btm

BUtterick Forecast patterns 9 A through 9 D, Delineator, November 1927.

Butterick Forecast patterns 9 A through 9 D, page 26, Delineator, November 1927.

Outfits with the blouse trimmed in the skirt fabric appear often in Delineator illustrations from the late twenties. Pattern 9 A strikes me as probably unflattering to any woman, but it does look nice as an Art Deco drawing….

Butterick pattern 9 A, from Delineator, p. 26, November 1927.

Butterick pattern 9A, from Delineator, p. 26, November 1927.

9A text 1927 nov p 26 forecast wardrobe 9D 9C 9B 9A and accessories btmDresses with applied trim like this one were often made from two fabrics in the same color but of contrasting textures (e.g., velvet and silk), so the bands on the bodice would be a subtle change of texture rather than of light/dark values as illustrated here. Double-sided silk crepe used with matte and shiny sides out was popular.

BUtterick 1775, Dec. 1927, and 1705, Oct. 1927. Delineator magazine.

These dresses use both the matte and shiny sides of double-sided crepe satin. Butterick 1775, Dec. 1927, and 1705, Oct. 1927. Delineator magazine.

The skirt of 9A  is described as “two piece” and “flared front;” during most of the twenties, the back of a skirt or dress was cut straight, with all of the fullness — and walking ease — in the front. See the “front flare” coat below.

Butterick coat pattern 9 B from Delineator, Nov. 1927, p. 26.

Butterick coat pattern 9-B from Delineator, Nov. 1927, p. 26.

450 text coat 9B nov 1927 nov p 26 forecast wardrobe 9D 9C 9B 9A and accessories btm

Accessories for Nov. 1927.

Accessories for Nov. 1927. Delineator, p. 26.

The “Oxford” shoe above left was recommended for wear with dress 9A, and the three-toned shoe and envelope purse at right are suggested for dinner dress 9C, below:

Butterick 9 C with matching jacket for dinner or bridge. Delineator, Nov. 1927.

Butterick 9C is a sleeveless gown with matching jacket for dinner or bridge. Delineator, Nov. 1927. The wide rhinestone “necklace” and “cuffs” are not jewelry, but part of the dress and jacket. I love the sporty — but rhinestoned — jacket!

450 9C dinner 1927 nov p 26 forecast wardrobe 9D 9C 9B 9A and accessories btm“The embroidery in necklace and bracelet outline is new and important.” In the same month, Delineator showed this drawing of a “Necklace Dress” by couturier Jean Patou; the “necklace” was actually trim on the dress:

A "necklace dress" by Jean Patou, illustrated in Delineator, Nov. 1927. The three-strand false "necklace" is trim applied to the dress.

A “necklace dress” by Jean Patou, illustrated in Delineator, Nov. 1927. The three-strand false “necklace” is trim applied to the dress.

 

Butterick pattern 9 D from Delineator, Nov. 1927.

Butterick pattern 9-D from Delineator, Nov. 1927.

450 dress 9D1927 nov p 26 forecast wardrobe 9D 9C 9B 9A and accessories btmBias panels joined by fagoting were associated with Vionnet. This diagram gives you an idea of how it works:

https://witness2fashion.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/black-dress-squares.jpgThe panels were connected by horizontal stitches over a space of an eighth to a quarter inch or so, leaving a tiny part of the undergarment visible. It meant the panels could move (slightly) independently. The dress would be worn with the bias in a vertical position. See a later vintage dress with fagoting as trim here.

Vionnet also used pin tucks to create diagonal lines across the front of dresses like this one, dated 1926-27 in the Metropolitan Museum collection. You could use double lines of pin tucks instead of fagoting to recreate Butterick 9-D.

 

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Filed under 1920s, bags, Dating Butterick Patterns, Dresses, Gloves, handbags, Purses, Vintage Accessories, Vintage Garments: The Real Thing, Vintage patterns

Summer Dresses from Butterick, June 1926

As I read through successive issues of Delineator, I enjoy finding patterns that have common elements. These four color pages from the June, 1926, issue were illustrated by M. S. Walle. Some of the fashion ideas I wrote about in May reappear on new styles in June, like this charming border print:

This 1926 two piece dress uses a border print fabric, although it could also be made in solids or prints. Butterick 6862 for Misses and Small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

This 1926 two piece dress uses a border print fabric, although it could also be made in solids or all-over prints. Butterick 6862 for Misses and Small Women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Delineator was a large format magazine, so I’ll show an overview of each color page and then select pattern illustrations for a closer look.

Clothes for Young Women, Small Women, and Teens, June 1926

Butterick patterns for Misses 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick patterns for Misses 15 to 20, and small women. Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick pattern 6865 for a simple dress included a handbag pattern. Delineator, June, 1926, p. 27.

Butterick pattern 6865, Delineator, June, 1926, p. 27.

This simple dress pattern included a handbag pattern. The long scarf-like tie passes through buttonholes in the front of the dress — a very common 1920’s feature.

This evening pattern, No. 6819, shows that not every twenties dress had a snug hip band.

This evening pattern, No. 6819, from 1926, shows that not every twenties dress had a snug hip band.

Butterick patterns 6831 and 6842, Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

Butterick patterns 6831 and 6842 for misses and teens, Delineator, June 1926, p. 27.

The dress on the left has “saddle shoulders” and a long, thin, vertical tie. The yellow dress is made of sheer fabric and has interesting cuffs, with a long ribbon in front to create a vertical line. The dress on the right, below, also has a long ribbon as trim.

The two dresses on the left ar for afternoon parties. (Remember "tea dances?") The dress on the right has decorative smocking. Butterick 6854, 6848, and 6873, Delineator, June 1926.

The two dresses on the left are for afternoon parties. (Remember “tea dances?”) The dress on the right has decorative smocking. Butterick 6854, 6848, and 6873, Delineator, June 1926.

Women’s Dresses, June 1926

Women's dress patterns from Delineator, June 1926, page 28.

Women’s dress patterns from Delineator, June 1926, page 28. “Plaits [Pleats] Narrow Down Smart Width to Parisian Slimness.”

The two dresses at top right look like house dresses, while the four bottom patterns are outdoor dresses, often worn for spectator sports. Notice all the vertical details introduced to draw the eye up and down, instead of across, the body.

Butterick patterns 6858 for a dress and bag, and dress 6867. Delineator, June 1926, p. 28.

Butterick patterns 6858 for a dress and bag, and dress 6867. Delineator, June 1926, p. 28. Triangular pockets!

Spectator sporty dresses, Delineator, June 1926, Page 28. Butterick patterns 6839, 6833, 6794 and 6853.

Spectator sport dresses, Delineator, June 1926, Page 28. Butterick patterns 6839, 6833, 6794 and 6853. “Plaits [pleats] narrow down smart width to Parisian slimness.”

The woman on the left is carrying a shooting stick (a combination walking stick and folding seat.) The white dress appears to have a large, printed scarf billowing behind it.  The dress with a long rectangular bib does not have a belt. The skirt part of dresses like the three at right usually were sewn to an underbodice (like a camisole) that allowed the skirt to hang straight from the shoulders instead of having a waistband.

Dressier dresses for women, Delineator, June 1926, page 29. Butterick pattern illlustrations by M.S. Walle.

Sheer dresses for women, Delineator, June 1926, page 29. Butterick pattern illlustrations by M.S. Walle. The fabric on the bottom four implies that these are afternoon dresses.

Two evening dresses for women, from Butterick patterns 6856 and 6860. Delineator, July 1926, p. 29.

Two evening dresses for women, from Butterick patterns 6856 and 6860. Delineator, July 1926, p. 29.

Orange was a popular color in the twenties; click for a  Chanel evening gown  made of “deep orange” lace.

Afternoon dresses 6871, 6875, and 6863, and a green dress (Butterick 6827) with a long tie threaded through an opening in the bodice. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 29.

Afternoon dresses 6871, 6875, and 6863, and a sheer green dress (Butterick 6827) whose collar ends in long ties threaded through an opening in the bodice. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 29.

Clothes for Children, Summer 1926

Butterick patterns for children, Delineator, June 1926, page 30.

Butterick patterns for children, Delineator, June 1926, page 30.

Dresses for girls 8 to 15 ?? and a little boy's suit. Delineator, June 1926, top left of page 30.

Dresses for girls 8 to 15 ?? and a little boy’s suit. Delineator, June 1926, top left of page 30. Butterick 6841, 6813, 6851, 6880.

Girls dresses from Butterick patterns 6866, 6845. amd 6861. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 30.

Girls’ dresses from Butterick patterns 6866, 6845, and 6861. Delineator, June 1926, bottom of page 30.

Several of the June dress patterns included a pattern for a handbag — even the ones for girls.

Dress pattern with matching handbags, June 1926. Butterick.

Dress patterns with matching handbags, June 1926. Butterick.

When the same design was manufactured in more than one size group, it was assigned different numbers:

These dresses all use ruching as a design element; the two at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. June 1926.

The two ruched dresses at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. June 1926.

These dresses all use ruching as a design element; the two at left are for Misses (No. 6854) and for girls and young teens (No. 6841.) Note all the different, age-related hem lengths. The ruched dresses for women, at right, are Butterick Nos. 6871 and 6863. Ruched dresses were illustrated in May, 1926, and there are other examples in this post.

Chiffon dresses with fluttering panes (aka handkerchief hems) from June (left, No. 6860,) May (No. 6796, center) and June, No. 6819. The pink dress is for MIsses and small women; the yellow one is in women's sizes. 1926.

Chiffon dresses with fluttering panes (aka handkerchief hems) from June (left, No. 6860,) May (No. 6796, center) and June, No. 6819. The pink dress (6819) is for Misses 15 to 20 and small women; the yellow one (6796) is in women’s sizes. 1926.

The gown at the left assumes a rather flat chest, but the two at right have gathering at their shoulders.

You may have noticed that many of these mid-twenties dresses have tucks,  gathering, or ruching near the shoulder, taking the place of bust darts to accommodate a normal female chest. 1926 was also the year when Delineator offered one pattern for a bust flattener next to a pattern for a non-flattening brassiere with two soft “pockets” — both patterns on the same page.

1926: gathering or ruching at the front shoulder takes the place of a bust dart.

1926: Gathering, ruching, smocking or tucks at the front shoulder take the place of a bust dart, creating a little fullness over the chest.

 

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Filed under 1920s, bags, Children's Vintage styles, Sportswear, Tricks of the Costumer's Trade, Vintage patterns