Tag Archives: Your Color and Why booklet 1920s

Fall Color from Indian Head Cloth, 1920s

Ad for Indian Head Cloth, Delineator, September 1925.

Ad for Indian Head Cloth, Delineator, September 1925.

Indian Head was a brand that assured customers that its cloth was colorfast — it could even be boiled — and it was guaranteed not to run or fade.

Schoolgirls, Ad for Indian Head cloth, Sept. 1925. Delineator.

Schoolgirls, Ad for Indian Head cloth, Sept. 1925. Delineator.

The text next to this picture says, “The young girl knows that her school dresses of Indian Head are smart, attractive, and comfortable. The new Permanent Finish gives the appearance of lightness, but quality and weave are unchanged.”

Ads from the previous year (1924) usually emphasize the appropriateness of Indian Head for children’s clothing.

Here, a mother admires the way her little boy’s “Tom Sawyer suit” emerged from the laundy:

Ad for Indian Head cloth, Sept. 1924, Delineator.

Ad for Indian Head cloth, Sept. 1924, Delineator.

“The spot came out, but the color stayed.” “This dress can be made at home with Standard Designer pattern No. 7696. The boy’s suit is one of several Tom Sawyer suits made of Indian Head.” 1924 sept p 52 indian head fabric#7696 ad bottom text 500

“Scrub them; boil them; the color will not fade. . . . We guarantee every garment or other article bearing the Indian Head label to give perfect satisfaction as to fast colors, workmanship, and finish. If not, we will refund the total cost of the article.”

This advertisement also offered a free booklet to help women choose the most flattering colors for their own clothing. “The blue that brunettes should wear, and hues that give color to pale cheeks, are among the color harmonies explained in our booklet, ‘Your Color and Why.’ It is sent free upon request.”

An Indian Head Ad from May, 1924 shows a picture of the “Bag for 25 cents,” available in two color combinations, jade-and-mimosa-yellow, or silver-and-peach.  For 25 cents, you got the material to make this handbag.1924 may p 54 indianhead cloth hem mom kid bag 500Indian Head cloth was also advertised not to fade in the sun; letting down hems cam be a problem if the cloth inside the garment, protected from the sun, is a different color than the rest of the dress. 1924 may p 54 indianhead cloth hem 500“When you let down the hem you will find that the color of the skirt has not changed a bit, for —”

Indian Head cloth guarantee, May 1924, Delineator.

Indian Head cloth guarantee, May 1924, Delineator.

Amory, Browne & Company, which produced Indian Head Cloth, also made Nashua Blankets, Gilbrae Ginghams, Parkhill Fine Gingham, Lancaster Kalburnie Ginghams, and Buster Brown Hosiery.

Indian Head label, May 1924.

Indian Head label, May 1924.

This logo appeared in the selvage of yardage, and commercially manufactured clothes made from Indian Head cloth also had a hang-tag naming Indian Head. Obviously, this was a company that took pride in its product. For a detailed history of the Indian Head label and Amory, Browne & Co. by info.fabrics.net, click here.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 1920s, bags, Children's Vintage styles, handbags, Hats, Old Advertisements & Popular Culture, Purses, Vintage Accessories